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Best matches for iraq AND military personnel AND reaction time AND stress disorders, post-traumatic:

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Items: 7

1.

Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury in the acute phase: acute stress reactions partially mediate the relationship between loss of consciousness and symptoms.

Norris JN, Sams R, Lundblad P, Frantz E, Harris E.

Brain Inj. 2014;28(8):1052-62. doi: 10.3109/02699052.2014.891761. Epub 2014 Mar 21.

PMID:
24655334
2.

Sleep disturbance is common among servicemembers and veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom.

Plumb TR, Peachey JT, Zelman DC.

Psychol Serv. 2014 May;11(2):209-19. doi: 10.1037/a0034958. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

PMID:
24274111
3.

Postdeployment threat-related attention bias interacts with combat exposure to account for PTSD and anxiety symptoms in soldiers.

Sipos ML, Bar-Haim Y, Abend R, Adler AB, Bliese PD.

Depress Anxiety. 2014 Feb;31(2):124-9. doi: 10.1002/da.22157. Epub 2013 Aug 19.

PMID:
23959788
4.

Residual effects of combat-related mild traumatic brain injury.

Kontos AP, Kotwal RS, Elbin RJ, Lutz RH, Forsten RD, Benson PJ, Guskiewicz KM.

J Neurotrauma. 2013 Apr 15;30(8):680-6. doi: 10.1089/neu.2012.2506. Epub 2013 Mar 26.

PMID:
23031200
6.

A soldier suffering from PTSD, treated by controlled stress exposition using virtual reality and behavioral training.

Tworus R, Szymanska S, Ilnicki S.

Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2010 Feb;13(1):103-7.

PMID:
20528300
7.

Association of time since deployment, combat intensity, and posttraumatic stress symptoms with neuropsychological outcomes following Iraq war deployment.

Marx BP, Brailey K, Proctor SP, Macdonald HZ, Graefe AC, Amoroso P, Heeren T, Vasterling JJ.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;66(9):996-1004. doi: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2009.109.

PMID:
19736356

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