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Menopause. 2013 Aug;20(8):818-24. doi: 10.1097/GME.0b013e31827fdd8c.

Aging, obesity, and multimorbidity in women 50 years or older: a population-based study.

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1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aims to evaluate multimorbidity and its associated factors in Brazilian women aged 50 years or older.

METHODS:

This is a cross-sectional, population-based study using self-reports. A total of 622 women aged 50 years or older were included. Multimorbidity was defined as two or more of the following morbidities: hypertension, osteoarthritis, cataracts, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, glaucoma, chronic bronchitis or asthma, urinary incontinence, cancer, myocardial infarction, stroke, and pulmonary emphysema. Sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral factors were evaluated. Data were analyzed using χ test and Fisher's exact test, and Poisson multiple regression analysis was performed. Prevalence ratios and their 95% CIs were calculated.

RESULTS:

In this sample, 15.8% of participants reported no morbidities, whereas 26% reported having one morbid condition and 58.2% reported multimorbidity. With respect to morbidities, 55.9% of women reported having hypertension, 33.8% reported having osteoarthritis, 24.5% reported having cataracts, 22.7% reported having diabetes, 21.3% reported having osteoporosis, 9.9% reported having glaucoma, 9.2% reported having bronchitis, 8.9% reported having urinary incontinence, and 6.8% reported having cancer, whereas 4.8% reported having had a myocardial infarction, 2.7% reported having had a stroke, and 1.8% reported having pulmonary emphysema. Multiple regression analysis showed that for each additional year of life, women increased their likelihood of multimorbidity by 3% (95% CI, 1.02-1.04). Furthermore, for each point increase (kg/m) in their body mass index, women also increased their likelihood of multimorbidity by 3% (95% CI, 1.02-1.04).

CONCLUSIONS:

Multimorbidity is principally associated with aging and obesity.

Comment in

PMID:
23549445
DOI:
10.1097/GME.0b013e31827fdd8c
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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