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Best matches for bacteremia AND emergency service, hospital AND fever AND hospitals, pediatric:

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Items: 16

1.

Bacteremia in nonneutropenic pediatric oncology patients with central venous catheters in the ED.

Moskalewicz RL, Isenalumhe LL, Luu C, Wee CP, Nager AL.

Am J Emerg Med. 2017 Jan;35(1):20-24. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2016.09.028. Epub 2016 Sep 17.

PMID:
27765482
2.

Bloodstream Infections in Patients With Intestinal Failure Presenting to a Pediatric Emergency Department With Fever and a Central Line.

Szydlowski EG, Rudolph JA, Vitale MA, Zuckerbraun NS.

Pediatr Emerg Care. 2017 Dec;33(12):e140-e145. doi: 10.1097/PEC.0000000000000812.

PMID:
27455342
3.

Validation of the "Step-by-Step" Approach in the Management of Young Febrile Infants.

Gomez B, Mintegi S, Bressan S, Da Dalt L, Gervaix A, Lacroix L; European Group for Validation of the Step-by-Step Approach.

Pediatrics. 2016 Aug;138(2). pii: e20154381. doi: 10.1542/peds.2015-4381. Epub 2016 Jul 5.

4.

Does extreme leukocytosis predict serious bacterial infections in infants in the post-pneumococcal vaccine era? The experience of a large, tertiary care pediatric hospital.

Danino D, Rimon A, Scolnik D, Grisaru-Soen G, Glatstein M.

Pediatr Emerg Care. 2015 Jun;31(6):391-4. doi: 10.1097/PEC.0000000000000454.

PMID:
25996230
5.

The association of emergency department crowding and time to antibiotics in febrile neonates.

Kennebeck SS, Timm NL, Kurowski EM, Byczkowski TL, Reeves SD.

Acad Emerg Med. 2011 Dec;18(12):1380-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1553-2712.2011.01221.x.

6.

Occult bacteremia in the post-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era: does the blood culture stop here?

Avner JR, Baker MD.

Acad Emerg Med. 2009 Mar;16(3):258-60. doi: 10.1111/j.1553-2712.2008.00345.x. Epub 2009 Jan 9. No abstract available.

7.

Prevalence of occult bacteremia in children aged 3 to 36 months presenting to the emergency department with fever in the postpneumococcal conjugate vaccine era.

Wilkinson M, Bulloch B, Smith M.

Acad Emerg Med. 2009 Mar;16(3):220-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1553-2712.2008.00328.x. Epub 2008 Dec 13.

8.
10.

Procalcitonin in pediatric emergency departments for the early diagnosis of invasive bacterial infections in febrile infants: results of a multicenter study and utility of a rapid qualitative test for this marker.

Fernández Lopez A, Luaces Cubells C, García García JJ, Fernández Pou J; Spanish Society of Pediatric Emergencies.

Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2003 Oct;22(10):895-903.

PMID:
14551491
11.

Prolonged partial thromboplastin times in children with fever and petechiae without bacteremia or sepsis.

Willwerth BM, Harper MB, Mandl KD.

Pediatr Emerg Care. 2003 Aug;19(4):244-7.

PMID:
12972821
12.

Population-based surveillance for hospitalized and ambulatory pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease in Santiago, Chile.

Lagos R, Muñoz A, Valenzuela MT, Heitmann I, Levine MM.

Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2002 Dec;21(12):1115-23.

PMID:
12488660
13.

Ceftriaxone use in the emergency department: are we doing it right?

Jain S, Sullivan K.

Pediatr Emerg Care. 2002 Aug;18(4):259-64.

PMID:
12187130
14.

Follow-up of patients with occult bacteremia in pediatric emergency departments.

Joffe M, Avner JR.

Pediatr Emerg Care. 1992 Oct;8(5):258-61.

PMID:
1408974
15.

Relationship of temperature pattern and serious bacterial infections in infants 4 to 8 weeks old 24 to 48 hours after antibiotic treatment.

Bonadio WA, Lehrmann M, Hennes H, Smith D, Ruffing R, Melzer-Lange M, Lye P, Isaacman D.

Ann Emerg Med. 1991 Sep;20(9):1006-8.

PMID:
1877764
16.

[Occult bacteremia at a pediatric emergency clinic].

Gómez Papi A.

An Esp Pediatr. 1990 Feb;32(2):136-8. Spanish.

PMID:
2346246

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