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Best matches for asperger violence:

Asperger's disorder and the criminal law. Freckelton I et al. J Law Med. (2011)

Brief report: violence in Asperger syndrome, a critique. Ghaziuddin M et al. J Autism Dev Disord. (1991)

Asperger syndrome, violent thoughts and clinically isolated syndrome. Vanderbruggen N et al. Acta Neurol Belg. (2010)

Search results

Items: 20

1.
Autism Res. 2018 May;11(5):738-754. doi: 10.1002/aur.1922. Epub 2018 Jan 23.

Measurement properties of tools used to assess depression in adults with and without autism spectrum conditions: A systematic review.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, UK.
2
Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, UK.
3
Centre for Innovative Research Across the Life Course, Coventry University, UK.
4
Centre for Violence Prevention, University of Worcester, UK.

Abstract

Depression is the most commonly experienced mental health condition in adults with autism spectrum conditions (ASC). However, it is unclear what tools are currently being used to assess depression in ASC, or whether tools need to be adapted for this group. This systematic review therefore aimed to identify tools used to assess depression in adults with and without ASC, and then evaluate these tools for their appropriateness and measurement properties. Medline, PsychINFO and Web of Knowledge were searched for studies of depression in: (a) adults with ASC, without co-morbid intellectual disability; and (b) adults from the general population without co-morbid conditions. Articles examining the measurement properties of these tools were then searched for using a methodological filter in PubMed, and the quality of the evidence was evaluated using the COSMIN checklist. Twelve articles were identified which utilized three tools to assess depression in adults with ASC, but only one article which assessed the measurement properties of one of these tools was identified and thus evaluated. Sixty-four articles were identified which utilized five tools to assess depression in general population adults, and fourteen articles had assessed the measurement properties of these tools. Overall, two tools were found to be robust in their measurement properties in the general population-the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), and the patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9). Crucially only one study was identified from the COSMIN search, which showed weak evidence in support of the measurement properties of the BDI-II in an ASC sample. Implications for effective measurement of depression in ASC are discussed. Autism Res 2018, 11: 738-754. © 2018 The Authors Autism Research published by International Society for Autism Research and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

LAY SUMMARY:

Depression is the most common mental health problem experienced by adults with autism. However, the current study found very limited evidence regarding how useful tools developed for the general population are for adults with autism. We therefore suggest how these tools could be adapted to more effectively assess depression in adults with autism, and improve these individuals access to mental health assessment and support.

KEYWORDS:

Asperger syndrome; COSMIN; assessment; autism spectrum condition; depression; general population; measurement properties; systematic review

PMID:
29360200
DOI:
10.1002/aur.1922
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2.
Lakartidningen. 2016 Aug 22;113. pii: D7H7.

Viktigt att uppmärksamma fixeringar vid våld och vapen - Varningssignaler bör leda till tidig intervention.

[Article in Swedish]

Author information

1
Neurovetenskap och fysiologi - Gillbergcentrum Gothenburg, Sweden Neurovetenskap och fysiologi - Gillbergcentrum Gothenburg, Sweden.
PMID:
27551874
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
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3.
J Psychol. 2017 Jan 2;151(1):49-68. doi: 10.1080/00223980.2016.1175998. Epub 2016 May 16.

Violence is Rare in Autism: When It Does Occur, Is It Sometimes Extreme?

Author information

1
a University of Salford.
2
b University of Aberdeen.
3
c University of Glasgow.
4
d Serial Homicide Expertise and Information Sharing Collaborative.
5
e Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Gothenburg.

Abstract

A small body of literature has suggested that, rather than being more likely to engage in offending or violent behavior, individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may actually have an increased risk of being the victim rather than the perpetrator of violence (Sobsey, Wells, Lucardie, & Mansell, 1995 ). There is no evidence that people with ASD are more violent than those without ASD (Im, 2016). There is nevertheless a small subgroup of individuals with ASD who exhibit violent offending behaviours and our previous work has suggested that other factors, such as adverse childhood experiences, might be important in this subgroup (Allely, Minnis, Thompson, Wilson, & Gillberg, 2014 ). Fitzgerald ( 2015 ) highlights that school shootings and mass killings are not uncommonly carried out by individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders, with frequent evidence of warning indicators. The aim of the present review is to investigate this in more detail using the 73 mass shooting events identified by Mother Jones (motherjones.com) in their database for potential ASD features. There are 73 mass shooting events but there are two events where there is a pair of shooters which meant that 75 mass shooter cases were investigated. This exercise tentatively suggests evidence of ASD in six of 75 included cases (8%) which is about eight times higher when compared to the prevalence of ASD found in the general population worldwide (motherjones.com). The 8% figure for individuals with ASD involved mass killings is a conservative estimate. In addition to the six cases which provide the 8% figure, there were 16 other cases with some indication of ASD. Crucially, ASD may influence, but does not cause, an individual to commit extreme violent acts such as a mass shooting episode.

KEYWORDS:

Mass shooting; asperger; autism; autism spectrum disorder; mass murder

PMID:
27185105
DOI:
10.1080/00223980.2016.1175998
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
4.
J Child Sex Abus. 2016 Apr;25(3):276-92. doi: 10.1080/10538712.2016.1145164.

Does Information About Neuropsychiatric Diagnoses Influence Evaluation of Child Sexual Abuse Allegations?

Author information

1
a Department of Law , Stockholm University , Stockholm , Sweden.
2
b Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Unit , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
3
c Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric Neuropsychiatry Unit , Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND), Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm , Sweden.

Abstract

This study aimed at investigating if attitudes toward children with neuropsychiatric disorders influence evaluations concerning allegations of child sexual abuse. Law students (n = 107) at Stockholm University, Sweden, were presented a transcript of a mock police interview with a girl, 11 years of age. This interview was based on a real case, selected as a "typical" example from these years concerning contributions from the interviewer and the alleged victim. After having read the transcript, the students responded to a questionnaire concerning degree of credibility, if the girl talked about events that had really occurred, richness of details, and if the narrations were considered truthful and age-adequate. Fifty-four of the students were also told that the girl had been given the diagnoses of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and Asperger syndrome. Students who were informed about the diagnoses gave significantly lower scores concerning credibility of the interviewee. To a lesser degree they regarded her narrations as expressions of what had really occurred and considered her statements less truthful. Furthermore, they found that the narrations contained fewer details. Finally, they found the girl less competent to tell about abuse. We conclude that a neuropsychiatric disorder may infer risks of unjustified skeptical attitudes concerning trustworthiness and cognitive capacity.

KEYWORDS:

Assessment; children; evaluation; legal issues; mental health; sexual abuse disclosure

PMID:
27135382
DOI:
10.1080/10538712.2016.1145164
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
5.
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2017 Jul;61(9):959-974. doi: 10.1177/0306624X15612719. Epub 2015 Oct 28.

Violent Fantasies in Young Men With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Dangerous or Miserable Misfits? Duty to Protect Whom?

Author information

1
1 Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA.
2
2 The Law and Behavior Foundation, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
3 Tilburg University, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Predictability of dangerousness in association with mental disorders remains elusive, outside of a few relatively well-established risk factors for the prognostication of violence, such as male sex, the presence of a psychotic disorder, and comorbid substance abuse. In clinical practice, inquiry into the presence of aggressive or violent ideation, in the form of ideas of homicide or suicide, is part of a standard mental status examination. Nonetheless, fantasy life, when it concerns harm toward others, may not be as reliable an indicator of imminent danger as it may be in the case of self-harm. Five cases of young Italian men with Asperger syndrome and recurrent and extremely violent femicide fantasies are presented. While there is no direct correlation between autism spectrum conditions and violence, as other humans, persons with an autistic condition are capable of committing crimes, including homicide. All five had in common a number of characteristics and behaviors felt to be pathoplastic: All had been bullied, all had been romantically rejected, all were long-standing First Person Shooter (FPS) game players, and all were avid violent pornography consumers. The potential for an actual neurocognitive impact of violent video games, well documented in the literature, and its combination with personal life history and chronic habituation following long-standing violent pornography use is discussed in the context of social and emotional vulnerabilities. While aggressive fantasies cannot and should not be underestimated, in countries where duty to protect legislation does not exist, a clinical approach is imperative, as, incidentally, should be anywhere.

KEYWORDS:

autism spectrum disorders; dangerousness; duty to protect; violent fantasy

PMID:
26510628
DOI:
10.1177/0306624X15612719
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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6.
Fam Process. 2013 Dec;52(4):619-52. doi: 10.1111/famp.12041. Epub 2013 Aug 5.

The efficacy of systemic therapy for internalizing and other disorders of childhood and adolescence: a systematic review of 38 randomized trials.

Author information

1
Institute for Collaborative Psychosomatic Research and Family Therapy, Centre of Psychosocial Medicine, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

Systemic therapy (ST) is one of the most widely applied psychotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of children and adolescents, yet few systematic reviews exist on the efficacy of ST with this age group. Parallel to a similar study on adults, a systematic review was performed to analyze the efficacy of ST in the treatment of children and adolescents. All randomized or matched controlled trials (RCT) evaluating ST in any setting with child and adolescent index patients were identified by database searches and cross-references, as well as in existing meta-analyses and reviews. Inclusion criteria were: index patient diagnosed with a DSM-IV or ICD-10 listed psychological disorder, or suffering from other clinically relevant conditions, and trial published by December 2011. Studies were analyzed according to their sample, research methodology, interventions applied, and results at end-of-treatment and at follow-up. This article presents findings for internalizing and mixed disorders. Thirty-eight trials were identified, with 33 showing ST to be efficacious for the treatment of internalizing disorders (including mood disorders, eating disorders, and psychological factors in somatic illness). There is some evidence for ST being also efficacious in mixed disorders, anxiety disorders, Asperger disorder, and in cases of child neglect. Results were stable across follow-up periods of up to 5 years. Trials on the efficacy of ST for externalizing disorders are presented in a second article. There is a sound evidence base for the efficacy of ST as a treatment for internalizing disorders of child and adolescent patients.

KEYWORDS:

Internalizing disorders; efficacy; family therapy; psychotherapy research; randomized controlled trial (RCT); systemic therapy

PMID:
24329407
DOI:
10.1111/famp.12041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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8.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Aug 6;133(14):1466-8. doi: 10.4045/tidsskr.13.0519.

When diagnosis makes us blind.

[Article in English, Norwegian]

Author information

1
General Practice Research Unit, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. anlui-k@online.no
PMID:
23929297
DOI:
10.4045/tidsskr.13.0519
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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10.
J Law Med. 2011 Jun;18(4):677-94.

Asperger's disorder and the criminal law.

Author information

1
Law Faculty, Department of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Monash University. l.Freckelton@vicbar.com.au

Abstract

Asperger's Disorder has the potential to be relevant to many aspects of the functioning of the criminal justice system. However, its mere presence does not excuse or justify all offending. The inquiry into its potential relevance to criminal offending and sentencing must be both contextual and informed by suitably qualified expert evidence. This column reviews court decisions in respect of offences of physical violence, sexual violence, arson, stalking/harassing and computer offences across a range of jurisdictions to evaluate how courts have latterly incorporated Asperger's Disorder into decisions about criminal responsibility and culpability.

PMID:
21774264
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
11.
Acta Neurol Belg. 2010 Dec;110(4):334-6.

Asperger syndrome, violent thoughts and clinically isolated syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, UZ Brussel, Brussel, Belgium. nathalie.vanderbruggen@uzbrussel.be

Abstract

A young man, 23 years old, with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), presented violent thoughts during a neurological consultation. He was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome based on a psychiatric and (neuro)psychological examination. Possible risk factors for acting-out and the implications for treatment, if CIS would evolve to MS, are discussed based on a review of the literature.

PMID:
21305864
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
12.
J Interpers Violence. 2009 Aug;24(8):1358-70. doi: 10.1177/0886260508322195. Epub 2008 Aug 13.

Risk factors for violent offending in autism spectrum disorder: a national study of hospitalized individuals.

Author information

1
Centre for Violence Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. niklas.langstrom@ki.se

Abstract

Little is known about risk factors for violence among individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study uses data from Swedish longitudinal registers for all 422 individuals hospitalized with autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome during 1988-2000 and compares those committing violent or sexual offenses with those who did not. Thirty-one individuals with ASD (7%) were convicted of violent nonsexual crimes and two of sexual offenses. Violent individuals with ASD are more often male and diagnosed with Asperger syndrome rather than autistic disorder. Furthermore, comorbid psychotic and substance use disorders are associated with violent offending. We conclude that violent offending in ASD is related to similar co-occurring psychopathology as previously found among violent individuals without ASD. Although this study does not answer whether ASDs are associated with increased risk of violent offending compared with the general population, careful risk assessment and management may be indicated for some individuals with Asperger syndrome.

PMID:
18701743
DOI:
10.1177/0886260508322195
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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13.
J Autism Dev Disord. 2008 Nov;38(10):1848-52. doi: 10.1007/s10803-008-0580-8. Epub 2008 May 1.

Violent crime in Asperger syndrome: the role of psychiatric comorbidity.

Author information

1
University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA.

Abstract

Although several studies have suggested an association between violent crime and Asperger syndrome (AS), few have examined the underlying reasons. The aim of this review is to determine to what extent psychiatric factors contribute to offending behavior in this population. Online databases were used to identify relevant articles which were then cross-referenced with keyword searches for "violence," "crime," "murder," "assault," "rape," and "sex offenses." Most of the 17 publications which met the inclusion criteria were single case reports. Of the 37 cases described in these publications, 11 cases (29.7%) cases had a definite psychiatric disorder and 20 cases (54%) had a probable psychiatric disorder at the time of committing the crime. These findings underscore the role of psychiatric disorders in the occurrence of violent crime in persons with Asperger syndrome and highlight the need for their early diagnosis and treatment.

PMID:
18449633
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-008-0580-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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14.
Nihon Rinsho. 2007 Mar;65(3):539-44.

[Asperger syndrome in adolescence: The problem and appropriate treatment].

[Article in Japanese]

Author information

1
National Hospital Organization Sakakibara Hospital

Abstract

I have described the corresponding method for bullying, independence and interpersonal relationships of company/opposite sex, thinking disorders caused by suffering damage or victimization and withdrawal and violence in the family among the problems in and in response to Asperger syndrome in adolescent cases. Psychotherapy is used for bullying and interpersonal relationship problems. Cognitive therapy and protective correspondence are more effective in bullying than the exposure method. It seems to be more effective to teach and instruct the corresponding principle as well as supportive response because interpersonal relationships are likely to involve failures. Pharmacological therapy was valid in feelings of paranoia and violence. Since the disorder has been recently conceptualized in pervasive developmental disorder, the scope of the subject has increased whereas Asperger syndrome used to be diagnosed in compliance with its classic examples. Therefore, it needs to clarify diagnostic examples based on new concepts, accumulate subject examples and verify the corresponding method with evidence.

PMID:
17354573
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
15.
Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci. 2006;43(3):166-73.

Criminal responsibility in Asperger's syndrome.

Author information

1
Geha Mental Health Center, Petah Tikva, Israel. nkatz@clalit.org.il

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Asperger's syndrome (AS) has been of much interest in the last two decades. Most people with AS are law abiding and are not involved in any violence. Over the years, however, there is increasing evidence of violent behavior and criminal acts committed by some people with AS. The characteristics of the link between AS and violation of the law requires identification and definition and the question regarding the criminal responsibility to be attributed to these offenders needs to be clarified.

DATA:

We present three cases that illustrate how the special characteristics of this syndrome and particularly the inability to assess social situations and appreciate others' point of view constitute the main cause for the violent behavior and the criminal offences. For this specific behavior, the AS patients lack the criminal intent or the intent to cause harm (mens rea), which is essential for criminal responsibility. Thus it is reasonable to consider some AS sufferers not criminally responsible for their actions and unfit to stand trial. This approach has been accepted by the courts.

CONCLUSION:

It can be inferred that people with AS may not be criminally responsible despite not suffering from a psychotic illness.

PMID:
17294982
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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16.
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2005;33(3):390-3.

Asperger's disorder and murder.

Author information

1
University of South Carolina School of Medicine, 15 Medical Park, Suite 102, Columbia, SC, USA. donnasw@gw.mp.sc.edu

Abstract

Little is known about the prevalence of violence and autistic spectrum disorders. This article reviews findings of current research on Asperger's disorder and violence. Criteria for diagnosing Asperger's disorder are given. Three cases are presented in which defendants with diagnosed Asperger's disorder were charged with murder. Specific symptoms in this disorder are discussed as they relate to issues of diminished capacity and criminal responsibility.

Comment in

PMID:
16186206
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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17.
J Autism Dev Disord. 2005 Jun;35(3):313-21.

Characteristics of children with autistic spectrum disorders served in comprehensive community-based mental health settings.

Author information

1
Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia 19104, USA. mandelld@mail.med.upenn.edu

Abstract

This study describes the characteristics of children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) receiving treatment in community mental health settings. Data from a national community mental health initiative was used to identify children who had received a primary diagnosis of ASD. These children were compared with children with other diagnoses on socio-demographic and psychosocial characteristics, presenting problems and service histories. Regardless of diagnosis, children were most often referred to service because of disruptive behaviors. Children with ASD were less likely to be referred for drug use, truancy or running away, but were more likely to be referred for social interaction difficulties and strange behavior. Many children had family histories of mental illness, substance abuse and domestic violence. Implications of these findings are discussed in detail.

PMID:
16119472
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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18.
Compr Psychiatry. 2005 Mar-Apr;46(2):111-6.

The childhood-onset neuropsychiatric background to adulthood psychopathic traits and personality disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, 422 04 Hisings Backa, Sweden. henrik.soderstrom@rmv.se

Abstract

Childhood conduct disorder (CD) and adult psychopathic traits according to the Psychopathy Checklist Revised (PCL-R) were the closest psychiatric covariates to repeated violent crimes and aggression among offenders under forensic psychiatric investigation in Sweden. As psychopathy is not included in the present psychiatric diagnostic systems, we compared total and factor PCL-R scores to Axis I disorders, including childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorders, and to Axis II personality disorders, to establish the convergence of psychopathic traits with other psychiatric diagnoses, and to identify possible unique features. Psychopathic traits were positively correlated with bipolar mood disorder and negatively with unipolar depression. The total PCL-R scores as well as the Factor 2 (unemotionality) and Factor 3 (behavioral dyscontrol) scores were significantly correlated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Asperger's syndrome/high-functioning autistic traits, CD, substance abuse, and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Cluster B personality disorders. The interpersonal Factor 1 showed none of these correlations and may capture features that are specific to psychopathy, distinguishing core psychopathy from other diagnostic definitions.

PMID:
15723027
DOI:
10.1016/j.comppsych.2004.07.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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19.
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2001;29(4):420-6.

Juvenile and young adult mentally disordered offenders: the role of child neuropsychiatric disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. leila.siponmaa@rmv.se

Abstract

A retrospective study of the prevalence of child neuropsychiatric disorders was done involving pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and Tourette syndrome in young offenders (15-22 years, n = 126) consecutively referred for presentencing forensic psychiatric investigation (FPI) in Stockholm, Sweden. Most offenders were referred for FPI because of serious offenses. Case report sheets were prepared, and retrospective neuropsychiatric DSM IV diagnoses were made by the first two authors. For best-estimated diagnoses, the case report sheets were then submitted to the fifth author, a child neuropsychiatrist with expertise in this area. Fifteen percent of the subjects had a definite diagnosis of ADHD, and another 15 percent had PDD, including 12 percent PDD not otherwise specified (NOS) and 3 percent Asperger syndrome. Autistic disorder was not found in any case. Tourette syndrome occurred in two percent of the cases. The rate of PDD is particularly striking. Neuropsychiatric diagnoses had been determined in the FPI in only a few cases. The contribution of constitutional problems to later criminal development may have been underestimated.

PMID:
11785613
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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