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Best matches for asperger sexual orientation:

Use of lithium for sexual obsessions in Asperger's disorder. Shahani L et al. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. (2012)

Sexual well-being of a community sample of high-functioning adults on the autism spectrum who have been in a romantic relationship. Byers ES et al. Autism. (2013)

Gender dysphoria in Asperger's syndrome: a caution. Parkinson J et al. Australas Psychiatry. (2014)

Search results

Items: 26

1.
Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2017 Dec;19(4):381-393.

Sexuality in autism: hypersexual and paraphilic behavior in women and men with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
2
Institute for Sex Research and Forensic Psychiatry, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
3
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
4
Institute for Sex Research and Forensic Psychiatry, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany ; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany.

Abstract

Like nonaffected adults, individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) show the entire range of sexual behaviors. However, due to the core symptoms of the disorder spectrum, including deficits in social skills, sensory hypo- and hypersensitivities, and repetitive behaviors, some ASD individuals might develop quantitatively above-average or nonnormative sexual behaviors and interests. After reviewing the relevant literature on sexuality in high-functioning ASD individuals, we present novel findings on the frequency of normal sexual behaviors and those about the assessment of hypersexual and paraphilic fantasies and behaviors in ASD individuals from our own study. Individuals with ASD seem to have more hypersexual and paraphilic fantasies and behaviors than general-population studies suggest. However, this inconsistency is mainly driven by the observations for male participants with ASD. This could be due to the fact that women with ASD are usually more socially adapted and show less ASD symptomatology. The peculiarities in sexual behaviors in ASD patients should be considered both for sexual education and in therapeutic approaches.

KEYWORDS:

Asperger syndrome; autism; hypersexual disorder; hypersexuality; paraphilia; paraphilic disorder; sexuality

2.
Autism Res. 2017 Nov;10(11):1823-1833. doi: 10.1002/aur.1831. Epub 2017 Jul 10.

Socio-sexual functioning in autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review and meta-analyses of existing literature.

Author information

1
Faculty of Health, Deakin University, 221 Burwood highway, Burwood, VIC, 3030, Australia.
2
Division TEACCH, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.

Abstract

Socio-sexual functioning encompasses an individual's interests, behaviors, and knowledge with respect to sexual, romantic, and social aspects of life. An individual's understanding of these domains is developed through a range of informal and formal avenues of sexual health education. The current model demonstrated this and proposed that, compared to typically developing individuals, those with ASD develop socio-sexual functioning differently due to having less peer engagement, less relationship experience, more parental guidance, greater use of online materials, receive less school-based sexual health education, and more support from wellbeing services. Systematic review and meta-analysis of existing literature revealed that individuals with ASD have greater difficultly adhering to privacy norms, engage in less social behavior, are described as engaging in less appropriate sexual behavior, have greater concerns about themselves, and receive less sexual health education. Having fewer opportunities for appropriate informal and formal sexual health education leaves them at a double disadvantage from others who are receiving this information from both of these avenues. Some of the current meta-analytic results are cautioned by large l-square statistics which suggest that a degree of variance is being caused by extraneous factors. Further empirical research in this area is needed to overcome current design and sample limitations. Finally, the Sexual Behavior Scale was the most commonly utilized tool in the meta-analyzed studies, thus comprehensive evaluation of its functioning is warranted. The importance of work in this area is highlighted by the central role of social and sexual wellbeing on one's quality of life. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1823-1833. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

LAY SUMMARY:

Review of existing literature revealed that individuals with ASD have greater difficultly adhering to privacy norms, engage in less social behavior, are described as engaging in less appropriate sexual behavior, have greater concerns about themselves, and receive less sexual health education. Having fewer opportunities for appropriate informal and formal sexual health education leaves them at a double disadvantage from others who are receiving this information from both of these avenues.

KEYWORDS:

Asperger's; autism; privacy norms; relationships; sexual behavior; sexual health education; sexual knowledge; socio-sexual functioning

PMID:
28691307
DOI:
10.1002/aur.1831
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Wiley
3.
J Autism Dev Disord. 2016 Sep;46(9):3155-65. doi: 10.1007/s10803-016-2855-9.

Aspects of Sexuality in Adolescents and Adults Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Childhood.

Author information

1
Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Gothenburg, Kungsgatan 12, 411 19, Gothenburg, Sweden.
2
Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Gothenburg, Kungsgatan 12, 411 19, Gothenburg, Sweden. eva.billstedt@gnc.gu.se.

Abstract

The literature concerning sexuality in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is limited regarding inappropriate sexual behaviours and paraphilias and its relation to age, verbal ability, symptom severity, intellectual ability, or adaptive functioning. A cohort of 184 adolescents and young adults (ages 15-39 years) with ASD diagnosed in childhood, including both low and high functioning individuals, was examined. The large majority were found to have a sexual interest and showed interest towards the opposite sex. Inappropriate sexual behaviours and paraphilias were reported for about a fourth of the individuals. No relationships were found between inappropriate sexual behaviours and any of the background variables listed above. However, associations were found between paraphilias and ASD symptom severity, intellectual ability, and adaptive functioning.

KEYWORDS:

Asperger syndrome; Autism spectrum disorders; Autistic disorder; Paraphilia; Sexuality

PMID:
27401993
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-016-2855-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Springer
4.

[Gender dysphoria in adolescents: difficulties in treatment].

[Article in German]

Abstract

In many children and adolescents with gender dysphoria only minor or no psychopathology is found. 43% of patients seen in the Frankfurt University Gender Identity Clinic for children and adolescents suffer from major psychopathology. To demonstrate difficulties in treatment of these patients courses of treatment in four such patients are presented. In two natal females major psychopathology made decision for reassignment very difficult. Two natal males were in addition not able to follow recommended treatment steps, in these patients diagnostic doubts arose.

PMID:
25296511
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
5.
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2015 Dec;59(14):1564-79. doi: 10.1177/0306624X14550642. Epub 2014 Sep 10.

The Dangers of Posthumous Diagnoses and the Unintended Consequences of Facile Associations: Jeffrey Dahmer and Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Author information

1
Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA The Law and Behavior Foundation, Amsterdam, The Netherlands mt.palermo@lawandbehavior.org.
2
Tilburg University, The Netherlands Forensic Psychiatric Centre de Kijvelanden, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Posthumous diagnoses are not uncommonly given to notorious public and historical figures by applying retrospectively, and typically in the absence of the individual being diagnosed, contemporary diagnostic criteria. Although this may be relatively easy and free of consequences when it concerns clear-cut medical conditions, it may have unintended repercussions in the case of psychiatric disorders by creating myths and perpetuating stigma. The case of serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer is a typical example where a somewhat facile and almost syllogistic application of perhaps over-inclusive criteria may have contributed to the legend of solitary murderers as possibly suffering from an autism spectrum condition. Although there may be an understandable human need to explain abominable and heinous behaviors, the lack of the possibility to verify a diagnostic theory and the ill-advised attempt to make a diagnosis fit may de facto be the basis of prejudice and profiling that do not correspond to clinical reality. Although there is no doubt that the brain is the organ of behavior, the authors caution against a budding neo-Lombrosian approach to crime and criminality and against the all too common use of widely differing terms in the study of deviance, such as crime, delinquency, and aggression, the operational use of which, often used interchangeably even in association studies, often erroneously leads to further confusion.

KEYWORDS:

Asperger syndrome; autism spectrum disorders; serial killers

PMID:
25209624
DOI:
10.1177/0306624X14550642
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Atypon
6.
Encephale. 2015 Sep;41(4):362-9. doi: 10.1016/j.encep.2014.08.010. Epub 2014 Sep 5.

[Autism spectrum disorder and suicidality].

[Article in French]

Author information

1
Équipe de psychiatrie de liaison, clinique psychiatrique universitaire, CHRU de Tours, boulevard Tonnelé, 37044 Tours cedex 01, France. Electronic address: g.huguet@chu-tours.fr.
2
8(e) secteur de pédopsychiatrie, centre hospitalier Sainte-Anne, 7, rue Cabanis, 75674 Paris cedex 14, France.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Most studies on suicide exclude subjects with autism spectrum disorders, yet there is a risk group. The purpose of this article is to present the data in the literature regarding the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of suicidality in subjects with autism spectrum disorders and to identify the factors that promote the transition to action.

METHODS:

This review was carried out using the data set collected in Medline PubMed, items with "autism spectrum disorder", "pervasive developmental disorder", "Asperger's syndrome", "suicide", "suicide attempt", and "suicide behavior".

RESULTS:

In all subjects from our research on PubMed, 21.3% of subjects with autism spectrum disorder reported suicidal ideation, have attempted suicide or died by suicide (115 out of 539 subjects) and 7.7% of subjects supported for suicidal thoughts or attempted suicide exhibited an autism spectrum disorder (62 out of 806 subjects), all ages combined. Suicidal ideation and morbid preoccupation are particularly common in adolescents and young adults. Suicide attempts are accompanied by a willingness for death and can lead to suicide. They are more common in high-functioning autism and Asperger subjects. The methods used are often violent and potentially lethal or fatal in two cases published. Suicide risk depends on many factors that highlight the vulnerability of these subjects, following autistic and developmental symptoms. Vulnerability complicating the diagnosis of comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders are major factors associated with suicidality. Vulnerability but also directly related to suicidality, since the origin of physical and sexual abuse and victimization by peers assigning them the role of "scapegoat" are both responsible for acting out.

CONCLUSION:

Given the diversity of factors involved in the risk of suicide in this population, this does not validate "a" program of intervention, but the intervention of "customized programs". Their implementation should be as early as possible in order to treat while the brain has the greatest plasticity. The aim is to provide the necessary access to the greatest possible autonomy. Hence, including working communication skills and interaction, these subject will have independent means of protection, an essential complement to measures to protect vulnerable subjects; the vulnerability of direct and indirect suicidality. Comorbid diagnoses must take into account the specificities of these patients, their difficulties in communicating their mental state, and adapted and innovative therapeutic strategies must be offered and validated.

KEYWORDS:

Asperger's syndrome; Autism spectrum disorder; Comorbidity; Comorbidité; Suicide; Suicide attempt; Suicide behaviour; Syndrome d’Asperger; Tentative de suicide; Trouble du spectre autistique; Victimisation; Victimization

PMID:
25200592
DOI:
10.1016/j.encep.2014.08.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Masson (France)
7.
Australas Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;22(1):84-5. doi: 10.1177/1039856213497814. Epub 2013 Jul 29.

Gender dysphoria in Asperger's syndrome: a caution.

Author information

1
Psychiatrist in private practice (retired), Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The incidence of Asperger's syndrome is reported as above average in young people presenting with gender dysphoria. Patients with Asperger's syndrome, however, are prone to obsessive preoccupations. This paper points out that the apparent dysphoria may in some cases prove to be a transient obsession.

METHOD:

Cases from the author's clinical practice were reviewed.

RESULTS:

Two young men with histories suggesting Asperger's syndrome presented with strong convictions of gender dysphoria, asking for hormonal and surgical treatment. Treatment was withheld and after several years both came to repudiate their 'transgender phase'.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients asking for sex reassignment should be assessed for indications of Asperger's syndrome. Irreversible treatments should be withheld until it is clear there is a genuine issue of transsexualism.

KEYWORDS:

Asperger’s syndrome; gender dysphoria; sex reassignment

PMID:
23897727
DOI:
10.1177/1039856213497814
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Atypon
8.
J Autism Dev Disord. 2013 Nov;43(11):2617-27. doi: 10.1007/s10803-013-1813-z.

Challenging stereotypes: sexual functioning of single adults with high functioning autism spectrum disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of New Brunswick, P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A3, Canada, byers@unb.ca.

Abstract

This study examined the sexual functioning of single adults (61 men, 68 women) with high functioning autism and Asperger syndrome living in the community with and without prior relationship experience. Participants completed an on-line questionnaire assessing autism symptoms, psychological functioning, and various aspects of sexual functioning. In general participants reported positive sexual functioning. Participants without prior relationship experience were significantly younger and more likely to be male and identify as heterosexual. They reported significantly higher sexual anxiety, lower sexual arousability, lower dyadic desire, and fewer positive sexual cognitions. The men reported better sexual function than did the women in a number of areas. These results counter negative societal perceptions about the sexuality of high functioning individuals on the autism spectrum.

PMID:
23526036
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-013-1813-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Springer
10.
Autism. 2013 Jul;17(4):418-33. doi: 10.1177/1362361311431950. Epub 2012 Oct 8.

Sexual well-being of a community sample of high-functioning adults on the autism spectrum who have been in a romantic relationship.

Author information

1
Department of psychology, University of New Brunswick, Canada. byers@unb.ca

Abstract

This study explored factors (gender, age, relationship status, symptomatology) associated with the sexual well-being of 141 (56 men and 85 women) adults with high-functioning autism and Asperger syndrome (HFA/AS) living in the community. Participants completed an online survey consisting of a measure of autistic symptoms as well as measures of dyadic and solitary sexual well-being. Canonical correlation analyses showed that participants who were currently in a romantic relationship reported more frequent dyadic affectionate and genital activity and greater sexual assertiveness and sexual satisfaction, pointing to the importance of context in an active sex life. After controlling for the first variate, men and individuals with less autism symptomatology, particularly in the social and communication domains, generally reported significantly greater dyadic sexual well-being, including greater sexual satisfaction, assertiveness, arousability, and desire and lower sexual anxiety and fewer sexual problems. Men also reported better solitary sexual well-being, including more sexual thoughts, more sexual desire, and more frequent solitary sexual activity; however, they had lower sexual knowledge. These results highlight the importance for research and sexuality education with individuals with HFA/AS to conceptualize sexual well-being as a multidimensional construct consisting of both dyadic and solitary aspects.

KEYWORDS:

Asperger syndrome; autism; relationships; sexuality

PMID:
23045223
DOI:
10.1177/1362361311431950
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Atypon
11.
Seishin Shinkeigaku Zasshi. 2011;113(12):1173-83.

[Gender dysphoria in pervasive developmental disorders].

[Article in Japanese]

Author information

1
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Sapporo Medical University, School of Medicine.

Abstract

Pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) are characterized by two essential symptoms: impairment in social interaction, and restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities. PDD include autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder, and PDD-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS). These three disorders are sometimes termed autism spectrum disorders. A recent epidemiological survey demonstrated that the rate of PDD may be almost 1% and that many PDD cases might not be diagnosed properly in childhood. Erik Erikson described eight stages of psychosocial development through which a normally developing human should pass from infancy to adulthood. In the theory, an adolescent shows 'Identity vs. Role Confusion'. It has been reported that individuals with PDD often have identity crises which sometimes include gender dysphoria. This phenomenon might be related to the so-called identity diffusion in youth. When they reach their young youth, it has been said that subjects with PDD realize their uniqueness and differences compared to others, and, as a result, they may develop confusion of identity which could be exhibited as gender identity disorder. A recent study demonstrated that, amongst 204 children and adolescents who visited a GID clinic in the Netherlands, 7.8% were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders after a careful diagnostic procedure by a multi-disciplinary team. Taken together, PDD and GID seem closely related to each other. In this paper, we present four PDD cases with gender dysphoria and related symptoms: 1) a girl with PDD who repeatedly asserted gender identity disorder (GID) symptoms in response to social isolation at school, 2) a junior high school boy with PDD and transvestism, 3) a boy diagnosed with Asperger's disorder who developed a disturbance of sexual orientation, and 4) a boy with Asperger's disorder and comorbid childhood GID. Many of the clinical symptoms related to gender dysphoria might be explained by the cognitive characteristics and psychopathology of PDD. The Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology published guidelines for the assessment and treatment of GID in 1997, and revised them in 2006. As a result, GID has become well known as a clinical entity in Japan, and there have been an increasing number of Japanese patients complaining of gender dysphoria. It is important to consider an underlying diagnosis of PDD when encountering patients with gender dysphoria.

PMID:
22352003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
12.
Narrat Inq Bioeth. 2012 Winter;2(3):207-11. doi: 10.1353/nib.2012.0058.

Growing up with autism: challenges and opportunities of parenting young adult children with autism spectrum disorders.

Comment on

PMID:
24406889
DOI:
10.1353/nib.2012.0058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
13.
Narrat Inq Bioeth. 2012 Winter;2(3):199-205. doi: 10.1353/nib.2012.0057.

Parenting adults with ASD: lessons for researchers and clinicians.

Comment on

PMID:
24406888
DOI:
10.1353/nib.2012.0057
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
14.
Narrat Inq Bioeth. 2012 Winter;2(3):189-97. doi: 10.1353/nib.2012.0056.

Resilience and the narratives of parents of adults with autism spectrum disorders.

Comment on

PMID:
24406887
DOI:
10.1353/nib.2012.0056
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
15.
Narrat Inq Bioeth. 2012 Winter;2(3):183-7. doi: 10.1353/nib.2012.0055.

Yet life keeps coming.

Comment on

PMID:
24406886
DOI:
10.1353/nib.2012.0055
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
16.
J Autism Dev Disord. 2012 Feb;42(2):301-6. doi: 10.1007/s10803-011-1227-8.

Brief report: female-to-male transsexual people and autistic traits.

Author information

1
Autism Research Centre, Psychiatry Department, Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK. rej2004@med.cornell.edu

Abstract

The 'extreme male brain' theory suggests females with Autism Spectrum Conditions are hyper-masculinized in certain aspects of behavior. We predicted that females with Gender Identity Disorder (who are masculinized) would have elevated Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) scores. AQ scores from five groups were compared: (1) n = 61 transmen (female-to-male transsexual people); (2) n = 198 transwomen (male-to-female transsexual people); (3) n = 76 typical males; (4) n = 98 typical females; and (5) n = 125 individuals with Asperger Syndrome (AS). Transmen had a higher mean AQ than typical females, typical males and transwomen, but lower than individuals with AS. Transmen have more autistic traits and may have had difficulty socializing with female peers and thus found it easier to identify with male peer groups.

PMID:
21448752
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-011-1227-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Springer
17.
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;44(12):1082-8. doi: 10.3109/00048674.2010.515561. Epub 2010 Oct 25.

Obsessions and compulsions in children with Asperger's syndrome or high-functioning autism: a case-control study.

Author information

1
Maudsley Hospital, London, UK. Hilary.Mack@adhb.govt.nz

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the clinical characteristics and symptom severity of children with obsessive disorder (OCD) plus autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with those of children with OCD plus Tourette's syndrome (TS) or OCD alone.

METHOD:

Children with OCD and ASD (OCD/ASD) (n = 12, mean age = 14.33, range: 12-18) were compared to children with OCD and TS (OCD/TS) (n = 12, mean age = 13.92, range: 9-17) and children with OCD-alone (OCD) (n = 12, mean age = 12.92, range: 9-17) on measures of obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptom frequency, severity, interference and other clinical variables.

RESULTS:

Patients from the OCD/ASD group rated their OC symptoms as equally distressing, time consuming and contributing to a similar level of interference in functioning as patients in the OCD/TS and OCD groups. The types of symptoms were similar across groups but patients with OCD/TS reported greater frequency of ordering and arranging compulsions, and a trend towards more sexual obsessions. Patients with OCD/ASD reported more peer relationship problems compared with the other two groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with ASD may experience a similar level of impairment from OC symptoms as children with TS plus OCD and children with OCD only. It is suggested that it is useful to establish both diagnoses given that obsessions and compulsions may respond to treatment, and their alleviation may improve functioning in children on the autism spectrum.

PMID:
20973622
DOI:
10.3109/00048674.2010.515561
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Atypon
18.
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2010 Jul;56(4):336-47. doi: 10.1177/0020764008101635. Epub 2009 Jul 17.

Belonging and doing: important factors for satisfaction with sexual relations as perceived by people with persistent mental illness.

Author information

1
Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University SE-20506, Malmö, Sweden. mona.eklund@med.lu.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is increasingly acknowledged that satisfaction with sexual relations forms an important aspect of people's lives, but little is known of factors associated with this phenomenon among people with mental illness.

AIM:

This study aimed to investigate how demographic, social, clinical, and health-related factors were related to satisfaction with sexual relations.

METHODS:

Patients with persistent mental illness (N = 103), recruited from an outpatient unit, were assessed regarding the target variables.

RESULTS:

No clinical variable, and only one demographic factor, namely being a cohabitant, was found to be important to satisfaction with sexual relations. Several social factors, pertaining to how everyday occupations were valued and how the social network was perceived, were shown to be of importance. General quality of life, but not self-rated health or interviewer-assessed psychopathology, was also important for satisfaction with sexual relations. A multivariate analysis showed that the most significant factor for satisfaction with sexual relations was how everyday activities were valued, and being a cohabitant explained some additional variation.

CONCLUSION:

Previous research indicates that the mental health care services largely neglect sexual problems among people with mental illness, and the findings may provide additional knowledge that may be used in the support of this target group.

PMID:
19617283
DOI:
10.1177/0020764008101635
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Atypon
19.
Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci. 2006;43(3):166-73.

Criminal responsibility in Asperger's syndrome.

Author information

1
Geha Mental Health Center, Petah Tikva, Israel. nkatz@clalit.org.il

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Asperger's syndrome (AS) has been of much interest in the last two decades. Most people with AS are law abiding and are not involved in any violence. Over the years, however, there is increasing evidence of violent behavior and criminal acts committed by some people with AS. The characteristics of the link between AS and violation of the law requires identification and definition and the question regarding the criminal responsibility to be attributed to these offenders needs to be clarified.

DATA:

We present three cases that illustrate how the special characteristics of this syndrome and particularly the inability to assess social situations and appreciate others' point of view constitute the main cause for the violent behavior and the criminal offences. For this specific behavior, the AS patients lack the criminal intent or the intent to cause harm (mens rea), which is essential for criminal responsibility. Thus it is reasonable to consider some AS sufferers not criminally responsible for their actions and unfit to stand trial. This approach has been accepted by the courts.

CONCLUSION:

It can be inferred that people with AS may not be criminally responsible despite not suffering from a psychotic illness.

PMID:
17294982
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
Icon for Israel psychiatry association
20.
J Autism Dev Disord. 2007 Nov;37(10):1969-86. Epub 2007 Feb 2.

Stalking, and social and romantic functioning among adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Medicine, Nursing, and Behavioural Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia stokes@deakin.edu.au

Abstract

We examine the nature and predictors of social and romantic functioning in adolescents and adults with ASD. Parental reports were obtained for 25 ASD adolescents and adults (13-36 years), and 38 typical adolescents and adults (13-30 years). The ASD group relied less upon peers and friends for social (OR = 52.16, p < .01) and romantic learning (OR = 38.25, p < .01). Individuals with ASD were more likely to engage in inappropriate courting behaviours (chi2 df = 19 = 3168.74, p < .001) and were more likely to focus their attention upon celebrities, strangers, colleagues, and ex-partners (chi2 df = 5 =2335.40, p < .001), and to pursue their target longer than controls (t = -2.23, df = 18.79, p < .05). These results show that the diagnosis of ASD is pertinent when individuals are prosecuted under stalking legislation in various jurisdictions.

PMID:
17273936
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-006-0344-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Springer
21.
Epilepsy Behav. 2006 Aug;9(1):111-8. Epub 2006 May 11.

Psychiatric comorbidity in adult patients with hypothalamic hamartoma.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. sali7@partners.org

Abstract

The objective was to investigate the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in adults with hypothalamic hamartoma (HH). A standardized clinical interview and assessment scales were used to assess for depression, anxiety, personality, and sexual behavior, based on previous findings in the pediatric population. We found a high prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders, with Major Depressive Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder being the most common. "Anxious" personality types were the most common. Symptoms of Asperger syndrome were high in males versus females. We concluded that depression and anxiety are common in adult patients with HH. Remission of cognitive, behavioral, and autistic symptoms has been reported with surgical tumor resection. Whether this can correct the psychiatric disturbances remains to be investigated. The need for adjunctive psychiatric treatment may nevertheless remain.

PMID:
16697263
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2006.03.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Elsevier Science
22.
An Pediatr (Barc). 2005 Oct;63(4):366-8.

[Asperger syndrome associated with macrosomia and sexual identity disorder].

[Article in Spanish]

Author information

1
Departamento de Pediatría, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, Spain. jfleta@unizar.es

Abstract

Asperger Syndrome is a pervasive developmental disorder of unknown origin, characterized by pedantic language, lack of reciprocity in social interactions, unusual interests, motor clumsiness and normal or above average intelligence quotient, among other symptoms. Since 1994 it has been defined as a specific entity. We describe the case of a boy with this syndrome, with elevated body weight and height and sexual identity disorder. These alterations have not previously been described in the scientific literature on Asperger syndrome.

PMID:
16219258
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
Icon for Ediciones Doyma, S.L.
23.
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;14(5):292-6.

Comorbidity of Asperger syndrome and gender identity disorder.

Author information

1
Psychiatric Department, University Hospital, Culmannstrasse 8, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland. bernd.kraemer@usz.ch

Abstract

The case of a 35-year-old biological woman with Asperger syndrome (AS) and gender identity disorder (GID) fulfilling DSM-IV criteria is reported. Against the background of recently emerging theories of cognitive male pattern underlying autism we present additional psychological assessments in order to discuss any possible interaction or discrimination between AS and GID. Whilst we explain GID as a secondary feature of AS, we examine the assumption of the necessity of treating GID in AS as a primary GID in accordance with international standards. We consider the treatment of GID as compelling, particularly because curative therapy for AS is lacking and with GID treatment in this vein, the patient gains psychosocial improvement.

PMID:
15981142
DOI:
10.1007/s00787-005-0469-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Springer
24.
J Forensic Sci. 2002 Nov;47(6):1347-59.

The case of Jeffrey Dahmer: sexual serial homicide from a neuropsychiatric developmental perspective.

Author information

1
Palo Alto Veterans Health Care System, CA, USA.

Abstract

Sexual serial homicidal behavior has received considerable attention during the last three decades. Substantial progress has been made in the development of methods aimed at identifying and apprehending individuals who exhibit these behaviors. In spite of these advances, the origins of sexual serial killing behavior remain for the most part unknown. In this article we propose a biopsychosocial psychiatric model for understanding the origins of sexual serial homicidal behavior from both neuropsychiatric and developmental perspectives, using the case of convicted serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer as the focal point. We propose that his homicidal behavior was intrinsically associated with autistic spectrum psychopathology, specifically Asperger's disorder. The relationship of Asperger's disorder to other psychopathology and to his homicidal behavior is explored. We discuss potential implications of the proposed model for the future study of the causes of sexual serial homicidal crime.

PMID:
12455663
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
25.
Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr. 2001 May;69(5):221-35.

[The course of infantile autism through adulthood. An overview of long-term follow-up data].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Abteilung für Psychotherapeutische Medizin am Zentrum für Psychiatrie Reichenau, Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster.

Abstract

The symptoms of infantile autism were first described almost 60 years ago. In contrast to its course in puberty and adolescence, follow-up-data on the late course in adulthood are decidedly sparse. As the outcome of research in the literature, we found 21 methodologically heterogeneous follow-up-studies. The arithmetic mean age of all subjects investigated was 24.0 years. The results are supplemented by various case reports and sporadic biographical reports by affected persons. On the basis of the available data, the discontinuous and dynamic changes of course verified in puberty and adolescence are not applicable to the third and fourth decades to the same extent. Gains in competence and autonomy appear to develop in the vocational rather than in the domestic sphere. The significantly more favorable courses of the form described by Asperger are continued in adulthood. The disorder-associated lack of empathy and social interaction is by no means experienced in terms of self-satisfaction by those concerned but rather as a loss. Interpersonal sexual needs are expressed by a substantial proportion of autistic adults. The cumulative mortality rates of the follow-up-studies suggest that the mortality rate among autistic patients is higher than among their non-autistic peers.

PMID:
11417262
DOI:
10.1055/s-2001-13933
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, New York

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