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Items: 4

1.
Autism. 2014 Nov;18(8):903-13. doi: 10.1177/1362361313496336. Epub 2013 Dec 16.

The construction and evaluation of three measures of affectionate behaviour for children with Asperger's syndrome.

Author information

1
The University of Queensland, Australia kate@psy.uq.edu.au.
2
The University of Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

Children with Asperger's syndrome are often reported by their parents as having difficulties communicating affection. This study aimed to develop a valid measure of affectionate behaviour that could be used to investigate and quantify these anecdotal reports and then be used in further intervention research. Using parent and expert focus groups, three measures (Affection for Others Questionnaire, Affection for You Questionnaire and General Affection Questionnaire) were developed with reference to the existing affection literature. The measures were completed by 131 parents of children with a clinician-confirmed diagnosis of Asperger's syndrome. Psychometric assessment of the measures revealed clear factor structures with high internal consistencies and significant concurrent validities. The findings suggest many children with Asperger's syndrome have difficulties with affectionate behaviour that significantly impact their daily functioning and relationships with others, signalling future research needs to develop interventions in this area. Limitations of the research are also discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Affection; Asperger’s syndrome; affectionate behaviour; measurement

PMID:
24343335
DOI:
10.1177/1362361313496336
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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3.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2010 Aug;24(4):227-38. doi: 10.1016/j.apnu.2009.07.004.

Beyond the roadblocks: transitioning to adulthood with Asperger's disorder.

Author information

1
College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN, USA. diane.lawrence@state.mn.us

Abstract

Growing up with Asperger's disorder is complex and fraught with difficulty. Although the literature includes some research related to the transition of youth with Asperger's disorder to school and employment, none pertains to the transition to adulthood and independent living. Although a marginal number of young adults with Asperger's disorder eventually achieve independence, many of them continue to depend on families for supportive services. Currently, health care organizations and social services lack coherent, integrated systems to assist youth with Asperger's disorder and their families with the out-of-home transition. To better facilitate the process, this article reviews the literature on Asperger's disorder, leading to a comprehensive, evidence-based transition assessment guide framed by A. Maslow's (1972) hierarchy of needs.

PMID:
20650368
DOI:
10.1016/j.apnu.2009.07.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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4.
J Autism Dev Disord. 2007 Nov;37(10):1969-86. Epub 2007 Feb 2.

Stalking, and social and romantic functioning among adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Medicine, Nursing, and Behavioural Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia stokes@deakin.edu.au

Abstract

We examine the nature and predictors of social and romantic functioning in adolescents and adults with ASD. Parental reports were obtained for 25 ASD adolescents and adults (13-36 years), and 38 typical adolescents and adults (13-30 years). The ASD group relied less upon peers and friends for social (OR = 52.16, p < .01) and romantic learning (OR = 38.25, p < .01). Individuals with ASD were more likely to engage in inappropriate courting behaviours (chi2 df = 19 = 3168.74, p < .001) and were more likely to focus their attention upon celebrities, strangers, colleagues, and ex-partners (chi2 df = 5 =2335.40, p < .001), and to pursue their target longer than controls (t = -2.23, df = 18.79, p < .05). These results show that the diagnosis of ASD is pertinent when individuals are prosecuted under stalking legislation in various jurisdictions.

PMID:
17273936
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-006-0344-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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