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Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2015;24(2):273-80. doi: 10.6133/apjcn.2015.24.2.06.

Maternal zinc status is associated with breast milk zinc concentration and zinc status in breastfed infants aged 4-6 months.

Author information

1
Division of Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
2
Pediatric Nursing Division, Nursing Service Department, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
3
Research Center, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
4
Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
5
Division of Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. Email: nalinee.cho@mahidol.ac.th.

Abstract

in English, Chinese

Breast milk provides adequate nutrients during the first 6 months of life. However, there are some reports of zinc deficiency in breastfed infants. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of zinc deficiency in infants aged 4-6 months and the associated factors. Healthy infants aged 4-6 months and their mothers were enrolled. They were classified by feeding types as breastfed (BF), formula-fed (FF), and mixed groups (MF). Data collection included demographic data, perinatal data, given diets, and anthropometric measurement. Blood from infants and lactating mothers, and breast milk samples were collected to assess plasma and breast milk zinc concentrations. From 158 infants, the prevalence of zinc deficiency (plasma level below 10.7 mol/L) was 7.6%, and according to feeding groups 14.9%, 5.3%, and 2.9% in the BF, the FF, and the MF groups, respectively. Breastfed infants with zinc deficiency had significantly lower maternal zinc concentrations compared with those without zinc deficiency. There was a higher proportion of maternal zinc deficiency in zinc-deficient infants than those without zinc deficiency (66.7% vs 16.2%, p=0.02). There was a positive correlation between zinc concentrations in breast milk and plasma zinc concentrations of infants (r=0.62, p=0.01) and plasma zinc concentrations of lactating mothers (r=0.56, p=0.016). Using the regression analysis, infant zinc status was associated with maternal plasma zinc concentrations among breastfed infants. The results of this study suggest that breastfed infants aged 4-6 months may have a risk of zinc deficiency and that risk is associated with maternal zinc status and breast milk zinc concentrations.

PMID:
26078244
DOI:
10.6133/apjcn.2015.24.2.06
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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