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Items: 1 to 20 of 70

1.

Relationship between Added Sugars Consumption and Chronic Disease Risk Factors: Current Understanding.

Rippe JM, Angelopoulos TJ.

Nutrients. 2016 Nov 4;8(11). pii: E697. Review.

2.

Sugars, obesity, and cardiovascular disease: results from recent randomized control trials.

Rippe JM, Angelopoulos TJ.

Eur J Nutr. 2016 Jul 14. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
27418186
3.

Controversies about sugars consumption: state of the science.

Rippe JM, Marcos A.

Eur J Nutr. 2016 Jun 20. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
27324026
4.
5.

Added sugars and risk factors for obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

Rippe JM, Angelopoulos TJ.

Int J Obes (Lond). 2016 Mar;40 Suppl 1:S22-7. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2016.10. Review.

PMID:
27001643
6.

Sweeteners and health: findings from recent research and their impact on obesity and related metabolic conditions.

Rippe JM, Tappy L.

Int J Obes (Lond). 2016 Mar;40 Suppl 1:S1-5. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2016.7. Review.

PMID:
27001641
7.

No Effect of Added Sugar Consumed at Median American Intake Level on Glucose Tolerance or Insulin Resistance.

Lowndes J, Sinnett SS, Rippe JM.

Nutrients. 2015 Oct 23;7(10):8830-45. doi: 10.3390/nu7105430.

8.

Fructose-containing sugars and cardiovascular disease.

Rippe JM, Angelopoulos TJ.

Adv Nutr. 2015 Jul 15;6(4):430-9. doi: 10.3945/an.114.008177. Review.

9.

Fructose containing sugars do not raise blood pressure or uric acid at normal levels of human consumption.

Angelopoulos TJ, Lowndes J, Sinnett S, Rippe JM.

J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2015 Feb;17(2):87-94. doi: 10.1111/jch.12457.

10.

Nonmedical reading for physicians: some modest suggestions.

Rippe JM.

Am J Med. 2014 Aug;127(8):e43. doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2014.03.031. No abstract available.

PMID:
25107404
11.

Lifestyle strategies for cardiovascular risk reduction.

Rippe JM, Angelopoulos TJ.

Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2014 Oct;16(10):444. doi: 10.1007/s11883-014-0444-y. Review.

PMID:
25092580
12.

The effect of normally consumed amounts of sucrose or high fructose corn syrup on lipid profiles, body composition and related parameters in overweight/obese subjects.

Lowndes J, Sinnett S, Pardo S, Nguyen VT, Melanson KJ, Yu Z, Lowther BE, Rippe JM.

Nutrients. 2014 Mar 17;6(3):1128-44. doi: 10.3390/nu6031128.

14.

Sweetened beverages and health: current state of scientific understandings.

Rippe JM, Saltzman E.

Adv Nutr. 2013 Sep 1;4(5):527-9. doi: 10.3945/an.113.004143.

15.

Sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, and fructose, their metabolism and potential health effects: what do we really know?

Rippe JM, Angelopoulos TJ.

Adv Nutr. 2013 Mar 1;4(2):236-45. doi: 10.3945/an.112.002824. Review.

16.

Lack of evidence for high fructose corn syrup as the cause of the obesity epidemic.

Klurfeld DM, Foreyt J, Angelopoulos TJ, Rippe JM.

Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Jun;37(6):771-3. No abstract available.

17.

Fructose, sucrose, and high fructose corn syrup: modern scientific findings and health implications.

Rippe JM, Kris Etherton PM.

Adv Nutr. 2012 Sep 1;3(5):739-40. doi: 10.3945/an.112.002600. No abstract available.

18.

Popcorn is more satiating than potato chips in normal-weight adults.

Nguyen V, Cooper L, Lowndes J, Melanson K, Angelopoulos TJ, Rippe JM, Reimers K.

Nutr J. 2012 Sep 14;11:71. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-11-71.

19.
20.

The effects of four hypocaloric diets containing different levels of sucrose or high fructose corn syrup on weight loss and related parameters.

Lowndes J, Kawiecki D, Pardo S, Nguyen V, Melanson KJ, Yu Z, Rippe JM.

Nutr J. 2012 Aug 6;11:55. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-11-55.

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