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Neuroimage. 2013 Jan 1;64:32-42. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.08.071. Epub 2012 Aug 30.

Predicting the location of human perirhinal cortex, Brodmann's area 35, from MRI.

Collaborators (140)

Lopez OL, Oakley M, Simpson DM, Porsteinsson AP, Goldstein BS, Martin K, Makino KM, Ismail M, Brand C, Mulnard RA, Thai G, Mc-Adams-Ortiz C, Womack K, Mathews D, Quiceno M, Diaz-Arrastia R, King R, Weiner M, Martin-Cook K, DeVous M, Levey AI, Lah JJ, Cellar JS, Burns JM, Anderson HS, Swerdlow RH, Apostolova L, Lu PH, Bartzokis G, Silverman DH, Graff-Radford NR, Parfitt F, Johnson H, Farlow MR, Hake AM, Matthews BR, Herring S, van Dyck CH, Carson RE, MacAvoy MG, Chertkow H, Bergman H, Hosein C, Black S, Stefanovic B, Caldwell C, Hsiung GY, Feldman H, Mudge B, Assaly M, Kertesz A, Rogers J, Trost D, Bernick C, Munic D, Kerwin D, Mesulam MM, Lipowski K, Wu CK, Johnson N, Sadowsky C, Martinez W, Villena T, Turner RS, Johnson K, Reynolds B, Sperling RA, Johnson KA, Marshall G, Frey M, Yesavage J, Taylor JL, Lane B, Rosen A, Tinklenberg J, Sabbagh M, Belden C, Jacobson S, Kowall N, Killiany R, Budson AE, Norbash A, Johnson PL, Obisesan TO, Wolday S, Bwayo SK, Lerner A, Hudson L, Ogrocki P, Fletcher E, Carmichael O, Olichney J, DeCarli C, Kittur S, Borrie M, Lee TY, Bartha R, Johnson S, Asthana S, Carlsson CM, Potkin SG, Preda A, Nguyen D, Tariot P, Fleisher A, Reeder S, Bates V, Capote H, Rainka M, Scharre DW, Kataki M, Zimmerman EA, Celmins D, Brown AD, Pearlson GD, Blank K, Anderson K, Saykin AJ, Santulli RB, Schwartz ES, Sink KM, Williamson JD, Garg P, Watkins F, Ott BR, Querfurth H, Tremont G, Salloway S, Malloy P, Correia S, Rosen HJ, Miller BL, Mintzer J, Longmire CF, Spicer K, Finger E, Rachinsky I, Rogers J, Kertesz A, Drost D.

Author information

1
Athinoula A Martinos Center, Dept. of Radiology, MGH, 149 13th Street, Charlestown MA 02129 USA. jean@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu

Abstract

The perirhinal cortex (Brodmann's area 35) is a multimodal area that is important for normal memory function. Specifically, perirhinal cortex is involved in the detection of novel objects and manifests neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease very early in disease progression. We scanned ex vivo brain hemispheres at standard resolution (1 mm × 1 mm × 1 mm) to construct pial/white matter surfaces in FreeSurfer and scanned again at high resolution (120 μm × 120 μm × 120 μm) to determine cortical architectural boundaries. After labeling perirhinal area 35 in the high resolution images, we mapped the high resolution labels to the surface models to localize area 35 in fourteen cases. We validated the area boundaries determined using histological Nissl staining. To test the accuracy of the probabilistic mapping, we measured the Hausdorff distance between the predicted and true labels and found that the median Hausdorff distance was 4.0mm for the left hemispheres (n=7) and 3.2mm for the right hemispheres (n=7) across subjects. To show the utility of perirhinal localization, we mapped our labels to a subset of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset and found decreased cortical thickness measures in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease compared to controls in the predicted perirhinal area 35. Our ex vivo probabilistic mapping of the perirhinal cortex provides histologically validated, automated and accurate labeling of architectonic regions in the medial temporal lobe, and facilitates the analysis of atrophic changes in a large dataset for earlier detection and diagnosis.

PMID:
22960087
PMCID:
PMC3508349
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.08.071
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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