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Exp Neurol. 2001 Dec;172(2):446-59.

Influence of serotonin on the glutamate-induced excitations of secondary vestibular neurons in the rat.

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1
Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. glivolsi@mbox.unict.it

Abstract

The excitatory responses evoked by glutamate and its agonists in secondary vestibular neurons of the rat were studied during microiontophoretic application of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Ejection of 5-HT modified neuronal responsiveness to glutamate in 86% of the studied units, the effect being a depression of the excitatory responses in two-thirds of cases and an enhancement in the remaining third. 5-HT was also effective in modifying 94% of the responses evoked by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), inducing a depressive effect in 76% of cases and an enhancement in the remaining ones. Quisqualate-evoked effects were depressed and enhanced by 5-HT in about the same number of cases; in contrast, kainate-evoked responses were enhanced. The depressive action of 5-HT was mimicked by application of alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (alpha-Me-5-HT), a 5-HT(2) receptor agonist, whereas the enhancing effect could be evoked by application of 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist. The 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist ketanserin was able to reduce, but not to block totally, the depressive action of 5-HT on glutamate- or NMDA-evoked responses. No significant difference was detected between neuronal responses in the lateral and the superior vestibular nucleus. These results indicate that 5-HT is able to modulate the responsiveness of secondary vestibular neurons to excitatory amino acids. Its action is mostly depressive, involves 5-HT(2) receptors, and is exerted on NMDA receptors. A minor involvement of other 5-HT receptors (at least 5-HT(1A)) and other glutamate receptors (for quisqualate and kainate) in the modulatory action of 5-HT is plausible.

PMID:
11716569
DOI:
10.1006/exnr.2001.7804
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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