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Wilderness Environ Med. 2012 Dec;23(4):349-55. doi: 10.1016/j.wem.2012.05.004. Epub 2012 Jul 3.

Fifty-three hours of total sleep deprivation has no effect on rewarming from cold air exposure.

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1
Exercise and Environmental Physiology Laboratory, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Sleep deprivation and cold air exposure are both experienced in occupational and military settings but the combined effects of these 2 stressors is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 53 hours of total sleep deprivation on thermoregulation during the rewarming phase (25°C air) after acute cold air exposure (10°C air).

METHODS:

Eight young men underwent 2 trials in which they either received 7 hours of sleep at night or were totally sleep deprived. On 3 consecutive mornings, the subjects underwent 2 hours of cold air exposure followed by 2 hours of rewarming. Rectal temperature, mean skin temperature, oxygen consumption, and thermal sensation were measured.

RESULTS:

Rewarming from acute cold air exposure caused a decline in rectal temperature (~0.5°C) each day but this was not different between subjects who were totally sleep deprived and subjects who received 7 hours of sleep at night. During this same period, mean skin temperature increased (from ~22°C to 27°C), oxygen consumption decreased (from ~7 to 4 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)), and the participants felt warmer.

CONCLUSIONS:

Under the conditions of the present study, sleep-deprived persons are not at a greater risk for a decline in rectal temperature (ie, a hypothermic afterdrop) during rewarming from cold air.

PMID:
22763083
DOI:
10.1016/j.wem.2012.05.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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