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  • Showing results for blumel, martina. Your search for Bluemel Martina retrieved no results.
1.
Sci Rep. 2018 May 22;8(1):7983. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-26177-y.

Combined genotyping, microbial diversity and metabolite profiling studies on farmed Mytilus spp. from Kiel Fjord.

Author information

1
GEOMAR Centre for Marine Biotechnology (GEOMAR-Biotech), Research Unit Marine Natural Products Chemistry, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Am Kiel-Kanal 44, 24106, Kiel, Germany.
2
Research Unit Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Fishes, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Duesternbrooker Weg 20, 24105, Kiel, Germany.
3
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, 7700 Sandholdt Road, Moss Landing, California, 95039, USA.
4
Senckenberg Natural History Collection Dresden, Population Genetics, Koenigsbruecker Landstrasse 159, 01109, Dresden, Germany.
5
Kieler Meeresfarm GmbH, Richthofenstrasse 31, 24159, Kiel, Germany.
6
Flensburg University of Applied Sciences, Kanzleistrasse 91-93, 24943, Flensburg, Germany.
7
GEOMAR Centre for Marine Biotechnology (GEOMAR-Biotech), Research Unit Marine Natural Products Chemistry, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Am Kiel-Kanal 44, 24106, Kiel, Germany. dtasdemir@geomar.de.
8
Kiel University, Christian-Albrechts-Platz 4, 24118, Kiel, Germany. dtasdemir@geomar.de.

Abstract

The blue mussel Mytilus is a popular food source with high economical value. Species of the M. edulis complex (M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis and M. trossulus) hybridise whenever their geographic ranges overlap posing difficulties to species discrimination, which is important for blue mussel aquaculture. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic structure of farmed blue mussels in Kiel Fjord. Microbial and metabolic profile patterns were studied to investigate a possible dependency on the genotype of the bivalves. Genotyping confirmed the complex genetic structure of the Baltic Sea hybrid zone and revealed an unexpected dominance of M. trossulus alleles being in contrast to the predominance of M. edulis alleles described for wild Baltic blue mussels. Culture-dependent and -independent microbial community analyses indicated the presence of a diverse Mytilus-associated microbiota, while an LC-MS/MS-based metabolome study identified 76 major compounds dominated by pigments, alkaloids and polyketides in the whole tissue extracts. Analysis of mussel microbiota and metabolome did not indicate genotypic dependence, but demonstrated high intraspecific variability of farmed mussel individuals. We hypothesise that individual differences in microbial and metabolite patterns may be caused by high individual plasticity and might be enhanced by e.g. nutritional condition, age and gender.

2.
Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2015 Apr;32:121-129. doi: 10.1016/j.copbio.2014.11.023. Epub 2014 Dec 30.

Flowering time regulation in crops—what did we learn from Arabidopsis?

Author information

1
Plant Breeding Institute, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Olshausenstr. 40, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
2
Plant Breeding Institute, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Olshausenstr. 40, D-24118 Kiel, Germany. Electronic address: c.jung@plantbreeding.uni-kiel.de.

Abstract

The change from vegetative to reproductive growth is a key developmental switch in flowering plants. In agriculture, flowering is a prerequisite for crop production whenever seeds or fruits are harvested. An intricate network with various (epi-) genetic regulators responding to environmental and endogenous triggers controls the timely onset of flowering. Changes in the expression of a single flowering time (FTi) regulator can suffice to drastically alter FTi. FTi regulation is of utmost importance for genetic improvement of crops. We summarize recent discoveries on FTi regulators in crop species emphasizing crop-specific genes lacking homologs in Arabidopsis thaliana. We highlight pleiotropic effects on agronomically important characters, impact on adaptation to new geographical/climate conditions and future perspectives for crop improvement.

PMID:
25553537
DOI:
10.1016/j.copbio.2014.11.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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3.
Front Microbiol. 2012 Dec 14;3:423. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2012.00423. eCollection 2012.

Widespread occurrence of two carbon fixation pathways in tubeworm endosymbionts: lessons from hydrothermal vent associated tubeworms from the mediterranean sea.

Author information

1
GEOMAR, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel Kiel, Germany.

Abstract

Vestimentiferan tubeworms (siboglinid polychetes) of the genus Lamellibrachia are common members of cold seep faunal communities and have also been found at sedimented hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific. As they lack a digestive system, they are nourished by chemoautotrophic bacterial endosymbionts growing in a specialized tissue called the trophosome. Here we present the results of investigations of tubeworms and endosymbionts from a shallow hydrothermal vent field in the Western Mediterranean Sea. The tubeworms, which are the first reported vent-associated tubeworms outside the Pacific, are identified as Lamellibrachia anaximandri using mitochondrial ribosomal and cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene sequences. They harbor a single gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont. Carbon isotopic data, as well as the analysis of genes involved in carbon and sulfur metabolism indicate a sulfide-oxidizing chemoautotrophic endosymbiont. The detection of a hydrogenase gene fragment suggests the potential for hydrogen oxidation as alternative energy source. Surprisingly, the endosymbiont harbors genes for two different carbon fixation pathways, the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle as well as the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle, as has been reported for the endosymbiont of the vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptila. In addition to RubisCO genes we detected ATP citrate lyase (ACL - the key enzyme of the rTCA cycle) type II gene sequences using newly designed primer sets. Comparative investigations with additional tubeworm species (Lamellibrachia luymesi, Lamellibrachia sp. 1, Lamellibrachia sp. 2, Escarpia laminata, Seepiophila jonesi) from multiple cold seep sites in the Gulf of Mexico revealed the presence of acl genes in these species as well. Thus, our study suggests that the presence of two different carbon fixation pathways, the CBB cycle and the rTCA cycle, is not restricted to the Riftia endosymbiont, but rather might be common in vestimentiferan tubeworm endosymbionts, regardless of the habitat.

KEYWORDS:

Lamellibrachia; Mediterranean Sea; acl gene; carbon fixation; cbbM gene; endosymbiont; hydrothermal vent; vestimentiferan tubeworm

4.
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2011 Dec;78(3):428-38. doi: 10.1111/j.1574-6941.2011.01175.x. Epub 2011 Aug 16.

Communities of purple sulfur bacteria in a Baltic Sea coastal lagoon analyzed by puf LM gene libraries and the impact of temperature and NaCl concentration in experimental enrichment cultures.

Author information

1
Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences, (IFM-GEOMAR), Kiel, Germany.

Abstract

Shallow coastal waters, where phototrophic purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) regularly form massive blooms, are subjected to massive diurnal and event-driven changes of physicochemical conditions including temperature and salinity. To analyze the ability of PSB to cope with these environmental factors and to compete in complex communities we have studied changes of the environmental community of PSB of a Baltic Sea lagoon under experimental enrichment conditions with controlled variation of temperature and NaCl concentration. For the first time, changes within a community of PSB were specifically analyzed using the photosynthetic reaction center genes pufL and M by RFLP and cloning experiments. The most abundant PSB phylotypes in the habitat were found along the NaCl gradient from freshwater conditions up to 7.5% NaCl. They were accompanied by smaller numbers of purple nonsulfur bacteria and aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. Major components of the PSB community of the brackish lagoon were affiliated to PSB genera and species known as marine, halophilic or salt-tolerant, including species of M arichromatium, H alochromatium, T hiorhodococcus, A llochromatium, T hiocapsa, T hiorhodovibrio, and T hiohalocapsa. A dramatic shift occurred at elevated temperatures of 41 and 44°C when M arichromatium gracile became most prominent which was not detected at lower temperatures.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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5.
Mar Drugs. 2011;9(4):561-85. doi: 10.3390/md9040561. Epub 2011 Apr 6.

Phylogenetic identification of fungi isolated from the marine sponge Tethya aurantium and identification of their secondary metabolites.

Author information

1
Kieler Wirkstoff-Zentrum, IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz-Institute of Marine Sciences, Am Kiel-Kanal 44, Kiel, Germany. jwiese@ifm-geomar.de

Abstract

Fungi associated with the marine sponge Tethya aurantium were isolated and identified by morphological criteria and phylogenetic analyses based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. They were evaluated with regard to their secondary metabolite profiles. Among the 81 isolates which were characterized, members of 21 genera were identified. Some genera like Acremonium, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Phoma, and Trichoderma are quite common, but we also isolated strains belonging to genera like Botryosphaeria, Epicoccum, Parasphaeosphaeria, and Tritirachium which have rarely been reported from sponges. Members affiliated to the genera Bartalinia and Volutella as well as to a presumably new Phoma species were first isolated from a sponge in this study. On the basis of their classification, strains were selected for analysis of their ability to produce natural products. In addition to a number of known compounds, several new natural products were identified. The scopularides and sorbifuranones have been described elsewhere. We have isolated four additional substances which have not been described so far. The new metabolite cillifuranone (1) was isolated from Penicillium chrysogenum strain LF066. The structure of cillifuranone (1) was elucidated based on 1D and 2D NMR analysis and turned out to be a previously postulated intermediate in sorbifuranone biosynthesis. Only minor antibiotic bioactivities of this compound were found so far.

KEYWORDS:

Tethya aurantium; cillifuranone; natural products; phylogenetic analysis; sponge-associated fungi

PMID:
21731550
PMCID:
PMC3124973
DOI:
10.3390/md9040561
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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6.
Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 2011 Oct;100(3):421-35. doi: 10.1007/s10482-011-9599-5. Epub 2011 Jun 14.

Isolation and characterisation of bacteria from the Eastern Mediterranean deep sea.

Author information

1
Kieler Wirkstoff-Zentrum am IFM-GEOMAR, Am Kiel-Kanal 44, Kiel, Germany.

Abstract

The Eastern Mediterranean deep sea is one of the most oligotrophic regions in the world's ocean. With the aim to classify bacteria from this special environment we isolated 107 strains affiliating to the Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes from sediments of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. As determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, in particular members of the genus Bacillus, were dominant and represented a remarkable diversity with 27 out of a total of 33 operational taxonomic units obtained from the untreated sediment. The considerable percentage of operational taxonomic units (42%) which may be considered to be new species underlines the uniqueness of the studied environment. In order to selectively enrich bacteria which are adapted to the deep-sea conditions and tolerate broad pressure ranges, enrichments were set up with a sediment sample under in situ pressure and temperature (28 MPa, 13.5°C) using N-acetyl-D: -glucosamine as substrate. Interestingly Gammaproteobacteria were significantly enriched and dominant among the strains isolated after pressure pre-incubation. Obviously, Gammaproteobacteria have a selective advantage under the enrichment conditions applied mimicking nutrient supply under pressure conditions and cope well with sudden changes of hydrostatic pressure. However, under the continued low nutrient situation in the Eastern Mediterranean deep-sea sediments apparently Firmicutes and Actinobacteria have a clear adaptative advantage.

PMID:
21671195
DOI:
10.1007/s10482-011-9599-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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