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Bone. 2012 May;50(5):1148-51. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2012.02.001. Epub 2012 Feb 10.

A bisphosphonate-coating improves the fixation of metal implants in human bone. A randomized trial of dental implants.

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1
Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. jahan.abtahi@lio.se

Abstract

Many surgical procedures use metal implants in bone. The clinical results depend on the strength of the bone holding these implants. Our objective was to show that a drug released from the implant surface can improve parameters reflecting the quality or amount of this bone. Sixteen patients received paired dental titanium implants in the maxilla, in a randomized, double-blinded fashion. One implant in each pair was coated with a thin fibrinogen layer containing 2 bisphosphonates. The other implant was untreated. Fixation was evaluated by measurement of resonance frequency (implant stability quotient; ISQ) serving as a proxy for stiffness of the implant-bone construct. Increase in ISQ at 6months of follow-up was the primary variable. None of the patients had any complications. The resonance frequency increased 6.9 ISQ units more for the coated implants (p=0.0001; Cohen's d=1.3). The average difference in increase in ISQ, and the effect size, suggested a clinically relevant improvement. X-ray showed less bone resorption at the margin of the implant both at 2months (p=0.012) and at 6months (p=0.012). In conclusion, a thin, bisphosphonate-eluting fibrinogen coating might improve the fixation of metal implants in human bone. This might lead to new possibilities for orthopedic surgery in osteoporotic bone and for dental implants.

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PMID:
22348981
DOI:
10.1016/j.bone.2012.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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