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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1996 Dec 10;93(25):14788-94.

Dramatically decreased high density lipoprotein cholesterol, increased remnant clearance, and insulin hypersensitivity in apolipoprotein A-II knockout mice suggest a complex role for apolipoprotein A-II in atherosclerosis susceptibility.

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1
Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics and Metabolism, Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10021, USA.

Abstract

Apolipoprotein (apo) A-II is the second most abundant apolipoprotein in high density lipoprotein (HDL). To study its role in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis susceptibility, apo A-II knockout mice were created. Homozygous knockout mice had 67% and 52% reductions in HDL cholesterol levels in the fasted and fed states, respectively, and HDL particle size was reduced. Metabolic turnover studies revealed the HDL decrease to be due to both decreased HDL cholesterol ester and apo A-I transport rate and increased HDL cholesterol ester and apo A-I fractional catabolic rate. The apo A-II deficiency trait was bred onto the atherosclerosis-prone apo E-deficient background, which resulted in a surprising 66% decrease in cholesterol levels due primarily to decreased atherogenic lipoprotein remnant particles. Metabolic turnover studies indicated increased remnant clearance in the absence of apo A-II. Finally, apo A-II deficiency was associated with lower free fatty acid, glucose, and insulin levels, suggesting an insulin hypersensitivity state. In summary, apo A-II plays a complex role in lipoprotein metabolism, with some antiatherogenic properties such as the maintenance of a stable HDL pool, and other proatherogenic properties such as decreasing clearance of atherogenic lipoprotein remnants and promotion of insulin resistance.

PMID:
8962133
PMCID:
PMC26214
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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