Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann Neurol. 1982 Dec;12(6):564-74.

Diffuse axonal injury and traumatic coma in the primate.

Abstract

Traumatic coma was produced in 45 monkeys by accelerating the head without impact in one of three directions. The duration of coma, degree of neurological impairment, and amount of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in the brain were directly related to the amount of coronal head motion used. Coma of less than 15 minutes (concussion) occurred in 11 of 13 animals subjected to sagittal head motion, in 2 of 6 animals with oblique head motion, and in 2 of 26 animals with full lateral head motion. All 15 concussioned animals had good recovery, and none had DAI. Conversely, coma lasting more than 6 hours occurred in one of the sagittal or oblique injury groups but was present in 20 of the laterally injured animals, all of which were severely disabled afterward. All laterally injured animals had a degree of DAI similar to that found in severe human head injury. Coma lasting 16 minutes to 6 hours occurred in 2 of 13 of the sagittal group, 4 of 6 in the oblique group, and 4 of 26 in the lateral group, these animals had less neurological disability and less DAI than when coma lasted longer than 6 hours. These experimental findings duplicate the spectrum of traumatic coma seen in human beings and include axonal damage identical to that seen in sever head injury in humans. Since the amount of DAI was directly proportional to the severity of injury (duration of coma and quality of outcome), we conclude that axonal damage produced by coronal head acceleration is a major cause of prolonged traumatic coma and its sequelae.

PMID:
7159060
DOI:
10.1002/ana.410120611
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center