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Burns. 2012 Jun;38(4):591-8. doi: 10.1016/j.burns.2011.10.015. Epub 2011 Nov 21.

Urban compared with rural and remote burn hospitalisations in Western Australia.

Author information

1
Centre for Population Health Research, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia. j.duke@curtin.edu.au

Abstract

AIM:

To compare the incidence, temporal trends and cause of burn hospitalisations between urban, rural and remote regions in Western Australia, 1983-2008.

METHODS:

De-identified linked hospital morbidity and mortality records for all persons hospitalised for an index burn in Western Australia were analysed 1983-2008. Annual age-specific incidence and age standardised rates were estimated. Poisson regression analyses were used to estimate temporal trends in hospital admissions by urban, rural and remote region.

RESULTS:

Of 23,450 burn-related hospital admissions 1983-2008, 14,007 (59.7%) were in urban, 5442 (23.1%) rural and 4021 (17.2%) remote hospital regions. Hospitalisation rates were higher in rural (Incidence rate ratio (IRR), 95% CI: 1.5, 1.4-1.6) and remote (IRR, 95%C: 2.1, 2.0-2.2) regions compared to urban. Age-standardised rates of burn hospital admissions declined from 1983 to 2008 for each region with 26-year declines of 56% (95% CI: 51-60) for remote, 71% (95% CI: 68-73) for rural, and 9% (95% CI: 4-14) for admissions in urban regions. Scald was the most common cause for urban admissions while flame the most common cause for rural and remote burn admissions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Significant differences in the incidence, and cause of burn were identified between urban, rural and remote regions in Western Australia.

PMID:
22103987
DOI:
10.1016/j.burns.2011.10.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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