Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2020 Feb 12;10(1):2497. doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-59104-1.

Toxic tall fescue grazing increases susceptibility of the Angus steer fecal microbiota and plasma/urine metabolome to environmental effects.

Author information

1
Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.
2
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.
3
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.
4
Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
6
Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. filipov@uga.edu.
7
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. filipov@uga.edu.

Abstract

Impaired thermoregulation and lowered average daily gains (ADG) result when livestock graze toxic endophyte (Epichloƫ coenophialum)-infected tall fescue (E+) and are hallmark signs of fescue toxicosis (FT), a disease exacerbated by increased temperature and humidity (+temperature-humidity index; +THI). We previously reported FT is associated with metabolic and microbiota perturbations under thermoneutral conditions; here, we assessed the influence of E+ grazing and +THI on the microbiota:metabolome interactions. Using high-resolution metabolomics and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, plasma/urine metabolomes and the fecal microbiota of Angus steers grazing non-toxic or E+ tall fescue were evaluated in the context of +THI. E+ grazing affected the fecal microbiota profile; +THI conditions modulated the microbiota only in E+ steers. E+ also perturbed many metabolic pathways, namely amino acid and inflammation-related metabolism; +THI affected these pathways only in E+ steers. Integrative analyses revealed the E+ microbiota correlated and co-varied with the metabolomes in a THI-dependent manner. Operational taxonomic units in the families Peptococcaceae, Clostridiaceae, and Ruminococcaceae correlated with production parameters (e.g., ADG) and with multiple plasma/urine metabolic features, providing putative FT biomarkers and/or targets for the development of FT therapeutics. Overall, this study suggests that E+ grazing increases Angus steer susceptibility to +THI, and offers possible targets for FT interventions.

PMID:
32051515
PMCID:
PMC7016188
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-020-59104-1
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center