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Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2020 Jan 2;18(1):1. doi: 10.1186/s12955-019-1245-3.

Assessing quality of life in older adults: psychometric properties of the OPQoL-brief questionnaire in a nursing home population.

Author information

1
NTNU Center for health promotion research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. gorill.haugan@nord.no.
2
Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Bodø, Norway. gorill.haugan@nord.no.
3
Faculty of Health and Social Science, Western University of Applied Science, Bergen, Norway.
4
University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
5
NTNU Center for health promotion research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
6
Faculty of Nursing, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey.
7
Social Worker, Kyambogo University and Butabika National Referral and Teaching Hospital, Kampala, Uganda.
8
Department of Teacher Education, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Well-adapted and validated quality-of-life measurement models for the nursing home population are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the psychometrical properties of the OPQoL-brief questionnaire among cognitively intact nursing home residents. The research question addressed evidence related to the dimensionality, reliability and construct validity, all of which considered interrelated measurement properties.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional data were collected during 2017-2018, in 27 nursing homes representing four different Norwegian municipalities, located in Western and Mid-Norway. The total sample comprised 188 of 204 (92% response rate) long-term nursing home residents who met the inclusion criteria: (1) municipality authority's decision of long-term nursing home care; (2) residential time 3 months or longer; (3) informed consent competency recognized by responsible doctor and nurse; and (4) capable of being interviewed.

RESULTS:

Principal component analysis and confirmative factor analyses indicated a unidimensional solution. Five of the original 13 items showed low reliability and validity; excluding these items revealed a good model fit for the one-dimensional 8-items measurement model, showing good internal consistency and validity for these 8 items.

CONCLUSION:

Five out of the 13 original items were not high-quality indicators of quality-of-life showing low reliability and validity in this nursing home population. Significant factor loadings, goodness-of-fit indices and significant correlations in the expected directions with the selected constructs (anxiety, depression, self-transcendence, meaning-in-life, nurse-patient interaction, and joy-of-life) supported the psychometric properties of the OPQoL-brief questionnaire. Exploring the essence of quality-of-life when residing in a nursing home is highly warranted, followed by development and validation of new tools assessing quality-of-life in this population. Such knowledge and well-adapted scales for the nursing home population are beneficial and important for the further development of care quality in nursing homes, and consequently for quality-of-life and wellbeing in this population.

KEYWORDS:

Factor analysis; Nursing home care; Nursing home residents; OPQoL-brief questionnaire; Psychometric properties; Quality of life; Wellbeing

PMID:
31898546
PMCID:
PMC6941243
DOI:
10.1186/s12955-019-1245-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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