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Patient Educ Couns. 2019 Oct 9. pii: S0738-3991(19)30440-9. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2019.10.004. [Epub ahead of print]

Parents' experiences and information needs related to childhood fever: A systematic review.

Author information

1
Faculty of Nursing, 5-187 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405-87 Avenue, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1C9, Canada. Electronic address: apt@ualberta.ca.
2
Faculty of Nursing - Level 3, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405-87 Avenue, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1C9, Canada. Electronic address: nesari@ualberta.ca.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 4-472 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405-87 Avenue, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1C9, Canada. Electronic address: hartling@ualberta.ca.
4
Faculty of Nursing, 5-187 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405-87 Avenue, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1C9, Canada. Electronic address: shannon.scott@ualberta.ca.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To synthesize current evidence about experiences and information needs of parents/caregivers managing pediatric fever.

METHODS:

We used systematic review methodology with an a priori protocol. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global, from 2000 to May 2018.

RESULTS:

We included thirty-six studies (n = 29 quantitative, n = 7 qualitative; 15,727 participants). Quantitative data contained four themes; 1) caregivers seek information about pediatric fever, 2) low knowledge is coupled with misconceptions and anxiety, 3) fever assessment and management practices vary, 4) demographic factors (e.g., ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, education) influence information needs and health practices. Qualitative data contained three themes; 1) tension between logic and emotion, 2) responsibility contrasted with sense of vulnerability, 3) seeking support and information to build confidence.

CONCLUSION:

Parents often overestimate the risks associated with pediatric fever and struggle to make decisions during a child's febrile illness - leading to caregiving actions that may not reflect current clinical recommendations. Parents seek knowledge about how to care for a febrile child at home and what indicators should prompt them to seek medical attention.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

In addition to providing clear, reliable information, interventions that address educational, pragmatic, and emotional domains may be effective in supporting parents.

KEYWORDS:

Caregivers; Experiences; Fever; Information needs; Parents; Pediatric; Qualitative research; Quantitative research; Systematic review

PMID:
31668490
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2019.10.004

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