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BMC Geriatr. 2019 Oct 29;19(1):292. doi: 10.1186/s12877-019-1313-x.

Resident and staff perspectives of person-centered climate in nursing homes: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, 172 Tong Zi Po Road, Changsha, 410013, Hunan, China.
2
Nursing Department, Ophthalmology Department, The third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Xiangya Nursing School of Central South University, 172 Tong Zi Po Road, Changsha, 410013, Hunan, China.
3
Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, 172 Tong Zi Po Road, Changsha, 410013, Hunan, China. lily.xiao@flinders.edu.au.
4
College of Nursing & Health Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, 5001, Australia. lily.xiao@flinders.edu.au.
5
School of Nursing and Department of Statistics & Data Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, 1710 Red River Street, Austin, TX, 78701, USA.
6
Health Nursing Research Center, Xiangya Nursing School of Central South University, 172 Tong Zi Po Road, Changsha, 410013, Hunan, China. feng.hui@csu.edu.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Person-centered care is widely recognized as a gold standard and is based on a supportive psychosocial climate for both residents and staff in nursing homes. Residents and staff may have different perspectives as to whether the climate in which they interact is person-centered, perhaps due to their different expectations of the nursing home environment and the provision of care services. The aim of this study was to explore and compare resident and staff perspectives of person-centered climate in aged care nursing homes.

METHODS:

This is a descriptive cross-sectional study using a cluster random sampling method. The study collected data in 2016 from residents (nā€‰=ā€‰251) and nursing staff (nā€‰=ā€‰249) in 23 nursing homes using a Person-centered Climate Questionnaire-Patient version and Person-centered Climate-Staff version. T-tests for independent-samples were used to compare scores ranked by nursing staff and residents.

RESULTS:

The mean scores of 'A climate of safety' subscale and 'A climate of everydayness' subscale rated by residents were significantly lower than those rated by nursing staff. The mean scores of 'A climate of hospitality' rated by residents were very low among the three subscales, an indicator of the need to improve a more home-like environment for residents. Residents in larger size nursing homes showed a higher score of person-centered climate compared with their counterparts in small size nursing homes.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study reveals that the perspectives and perceptions of person-centered climate differ between residents and nursing staff. Therefore, both resident and staff perspectives should be taken into account in attempting to improve person-centered climate for better care outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Aged care; Nursing homes; Nursing staff; Older people; Person-centered care

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