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Science. 2019 Sep 6;365(6457):1033-1036. doi: 10.1126/science.aaw7765.

Blocking α4β7 integrin binding to SIV does not improve virologic control.

Author information

1
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.
2
Laboratory of Immunoregulation, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
3
MassBiologics, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
4
AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, Frederick National Laboratory, Frederick, MD, USA.
5
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA. roederer@nih.gov.

Abstract

A study in nonhuman primates reported that infusions of an antibody against α4β7 integrin, in combination with antiretroviral therapy, showed consistent, durable control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in rhesus macaques. The antibody used has pleiotropic effects, so we set out to gain insight into the underlying mechanism by comparing this treatment to treatment with non-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against the SIV envelope glycoprotein that only block α4β7 binding to SIV Env but have no other host-directed effects. Similar to the initial study, we used an attenuated strain of SIV containing a stop codon in nef. The study used 30 macaques that all began antiretroviral therapy and then were divided into five groups to receive different antibody treatments. Unlike the published report, we found no sustained virologic control by these treatments in vivo.

PMID:
31488690
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaw7765

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