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Gerontologist. 2019 Jul 19. pii: gnz087. doi: 10.1093/geront/gnz087. [Epub ahead of print]

Identifying and Managing Hearing and Vision Loss in Older People in Care Homes: A Scoping Review of the Evidence.

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1
Centre for Applied Dementia Studies, Faculty of Health Studies, University of Bradford, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Poor identification of sensory impairments in care homes can be due to multiple factors. This scoping review identifies and synthesizes the literature into the detection of hearing and vision loss in the care home environment, and the management of these sensory losses once identified.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

A scoping review methodology was used to identify primary research of any design published from 1985 to September 2018. Six electronic databases were searched, and articles were also sourced from reference lists, relevant charity organizations and published experts.

RESULTS:

Six electronic databases and multiple gray literature sources identified 51 articles for inclusion. The evidence confirmed that lack of knowledge in care home staff, poor management of assistive aids, unsuitable environment, lack of connections with optometrists and audiologists, underuse of effective screening tools, and the added complexity of assisting those with dementia are all barriers to effective practice. Conversely, flexible training programs, availability of a variety of assistive aids, simple screening tools, and adaptions to the environment are effective facilitators.

DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATION:

This review acknowledges that the barriers to identification and management of hearing and vision loss in care homes are multifaceted and that collaboration of multiple stakeholders is required to implement change and improve the residents' ear and eye care. Recommendations are offered to support more effective service provision tailored to meet the needs of people with sensory impairments living in care homes, and this could subsequently improve best practice.

KEYWORDS:

Long-term care; Sensory; Service provision

PMID:
31322168
DOI:
10.1093/geront/gnz087

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