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BMC Geriatr. 2019 Jun 25;19(1):177. doi: 10.1186/s12877-019-1187-y.

Process outcomes of a multifaceted, interdisciplinary knowledge translation intervention in aged care: results from the vitamin D implementation (ViDAus) study.

Author information

1
Menzies Centre for Health Policy, University of Sydney, Charles Perkins Centre D17, Camperdown, NSW, 2006, Australia.
2
John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Research, University of Sydney, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, 2065, Australia.
3
NHMRC Cognitive Decline Partnership Centre, Hornsby Ku-ring-gai Health Service, Hornsby, NSW, 2077, Australia.
4
John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Research, University of Sydney, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, 2065, Australia. ian.cameron@sydney.edu.au.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vitamin D supplement use is recommended best practice in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) for the prevention of falls, however has experienced delays in uptake. Following successful international efforts at implementing this evidence into practice, the ViDAus study sought to replicate this success for the Australian context. The aim of this paper is to report on the process outcomes of implementing this intervention.

METHODS:

Forty-one RACFs were engaged in a multifaceted, interdisciplinary knowledge translation intervention. This focused on raising awareness to improve knowledge on vitamin D, and supporting facilities to identify barriers and implement locally devised strategies to improve the uptake of evidence based practice (EBP).

RESULTS:

Staff members of participating facilities (n = 509 including nursing, care and allied health staff) were well engaged and accepting of the intervention, though engagement of servicing general practitioners (GPs) (n = 497) and pharmacists (n = 9) was poor. Facilities each identified between three and eight strategies focused on raising awareness, identifying residents to target for vitamin D and creating referral pathways depending upon their own locally identified barriers and capacity. There was variable success at implementing these over the 12-month intervention period. Whilst this study successfully raised awareness among staff, residents and their family members, barriers were identified that hindered engagement of GPs.

CONCLUSIONS:

The intervention was overall feasible to implement and perceived as appropriate by GPs, pharmacists, facility staff, residents and family members. More facilitation, higher-level organisational support and strategies to improve RACF access to GPs however were identified as important improvements for the implementation of vitamin D supplement use.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Retrospectively registered (ANZCTR ID: ACTRN12616000782437 ) on 15 June 2016.

KEYWORDS:

Barriers; Falls; Frail older adults; Preventive medicine; Residential facilities; Vitamin D

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