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MedEdPORTAL. 2018 Dec 21;14:10787. doi: 10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10787.

Human Papillomavirus: From Basic Science to Clinical Management for Preclinical Medical Students.

Author information

1
Resident, Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Program, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.
2
Senior Coordinator, Clinical Studies, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
3
Senior Systems Analyst, Office of Health Policy, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
4
Principal Statistical Analyst, Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
5
Assistant Dean for Educational Programs, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.
6
Professor, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Abstract

Introduction:

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with 30,000 cancer diagnoses a year, but the HPV vaccination is administered less frequently than other vaccinations. Future providers are a potential target for improving rates, and this flipped classroom module was developed to educate future vaccinators on HPV virology, vaccination, and clinical management.

Methods:

Designed as a clinical correlation for a basic science curriculum on introductory virology and immunology, this weeklong module consisted of a 1-hour lecture and case presentation, assigned articles, and a 90-minute wrap-up session including individual and group quizzes over the assigned material, a group clinical application exercise, and a 20-minute lecture on the case and real-world applications. A pre-/posttest survey was done on general knowledge of HPV, satisfaction with education, and willingness to recommend vaccination for HPV.

Results:

This module was designed for first-year students, 491 of whom have performed well in it. Pre-/posttest surveys of 243 students indicated that they significantly improved their knowledge of HPV (from 66.3% premodule to 86.3% postmodule, p <.001) and their satisfaction with medical education on vaccination-related topics, as well as increasing their willingness to recommend vaccination (from 58% premodule to 100% postmodule, p <.001).

Discussion:

This module is an effective and satisfactory way to teach first-year medical students about HPV and HPV vaccination and improves reported willingness to recommend vaccination. With limited resources available to effectively teach HPV vaccination to preclinical medical students, this module fills a gap.

KEYWORDS:

Anal Cancer; Cervical Cancer; HPV; Human Papillomavirus; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Preclinical; TBL; Team Based; Vaccination

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