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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2019 Apr 1;197:37-41. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.12.012. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Electronic cigarette and tobacco use in individuals entering methadone or buprenorphine treatment.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Electronic address: stephen.baldassarri@yale.edu.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of General Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; APT Foundation, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
APT Foundation, New Haven, CT, USA; Department of Internal Medicine - AIDS, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
5
Department of Family and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA; MJHS Institute for Innovation in Palliative Care, New York, NY, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
7
APT Foundation, New Haven, CT, USA; Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
8
APT Foundation, New Haven, CT, USA; Yale School of Public Health, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, New Haven, CT, USA.
9
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; APT Foundation, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although smoking is prevalent among populations with opioid use disorder (OUD), few studies have examined electronic cigarette (EC) use in individuals seeking opioid agonist therapy (OAT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and correlates of EC use among individuals seeking OAT.

METHODS:

782 patients seeking OAT for OUD completed surveys assessing current and past EC use, reasons for use, current and past cigarette smoking, nicotine dependence, psychiatric distress, trauma, and pain. Bivariate and multivariate models evaluated correlates of daily EC use, past-30-day EC use, and current cigarette smoking.

RESULTS:

6% of patients reported daily EC use, 18% reported past-30-day use, 62% reported EC use history, and 85% reported current cigarette smoking. 46% reported using ECs to quit or cut down smoking. In multivariate analyses, daily EC use was associated with higher odds of being a former smoker (OR 21; CI 1.7-273) and lower odds of ever smoking more than 100 cigarettes (OR 0.07; CI 0.01-0.32), while EC use in the past 30 days was associated with lower odds of being Caucasian (OR 0.55; CI 0.34-0.89), ever smoking more than 100 cigarettes (OR 0.13; CI 0.02-0.67), and history of chronic pain (OR 0.59; CI 0.38-0.90), and higher odds of reporting psychiatric distress (OR 1.5; CI 1.1-2.2).

CONCLUSIONS:

EC use is common among people with OUD who smoke cigarettes. Those with daily use had higher odds of being former smokers than current smokers. Interventions using ECs may be effective to help reduce harms and mortality in OUD.

KEYWORDS:

Electronic cigarette; Methadone; Nicotine; Opioid; Smoking; Tobacco

PMID:
30769264
PMCID:
PMC6637405
[Available on 2020-04-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.12.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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