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Clin Infect Dis. 2019 Feb 2. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciz077. [Epub ahead of print]

Increased Fragility Fracture Rates in Older Men with Osteomyelitis.

Author information

1
Section of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
2
VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA.
3
G.H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
4
Division of Infectious Diseases, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
5
Washington, DC VA Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
6
George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA.
7
VA North Texas Healthcare System, Dallas, TX, USA.
8
Infectious Diseases Section, Michael E DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA.
9
Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine Houston, TX, USA.
10
Section of General Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
11
Yale School of Nursing, West Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

This study evaluated fracture incidence over a 10-year period among men with and without osteomyelitis from the Veterans Aging Cohort Study. Fracture incidence was significantly higher among those with osteomyelitis at all osteoporotic fracture sites after adjusting for key related risk factors. Future prospective studies are warranted.

PMID:
30715288
DOI:
10.1093/cid/ciz077

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