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Viruses. 2019 Jan 14;11(1). pii: E60. doi: 10.3390/v11010060.

Advances in MERS-CoV Vaccines and Therapeutics Based on the Receptor-Binding Domain.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071, China. yszhou@bmi.ac.cn.
2
Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, China. yszhou@bmi.ac.cn.
3
Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. y.yang@yale.edu.
4
Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. JHuang2@nybc.org.
5
Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. SJiang@nybc.org.
6
Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. ldu@nybc.org.

Abstract

Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an infectious virus that was first reported in 2012. The MERS-CoV genome encodes four major structural proteins, among which the spike (S) protein has a key role in viral infection and pathogenesis. The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the S protein contains a critical neutralizing domain and is an important target for development of MERS vaccines and therapeutics. In this review, we describe the relevant features of the MERS-CoV S-protein RBD, summarize recent advances in the development of MERS-CoV RBD-based vaccines and therapeutic antibodies, and illustrate potential challenges and strategies to further improve their efficacy.

KEYWORDS:

Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; receptor-binding domain; spike protein; therapeutics; vaccines

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