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Eur J Radiol. 2019 Jan;110:225-232. doi: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2018.12.003. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

Thoracic cage injuries.

Author information

1
Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: kimia.kani@umm.edu.
2
Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 4245 Roosevelt Way NE, Box 354755, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA. Electronic address: hyomul@uw.edu.
3
Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 06520-8042, USA. Electronic address: rhees27@yahoo.com.
4
Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 4245 Roosevelt Way NE, Box 354755, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA. Electronic address: fchew@uw.edu.

Abstract

Rib fractures are the most common form of blunt thoracic injury. Multiple rib fractures are an important indicator of trauma severity, with increased morbidity and mortality occurring with increasing numbers of rib fractures, especially in the elderly. Thoracic cage injuries may be associated with concomitant and potentially life-threating injuries. In the acute setting, correct recognition of the pattern, extent and severity of thoracic cage injuries, may aid in more accurate delineation of concomitant injuries.

KEYWORDS:

Chondrosternal junction disruption; Costal cartilage fracture; Costochondral separation; Manubriosternal joint injuries; Rib fracture; Sternal fracture

PMID:
30599865
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejrad.2018.12.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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