Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Implant Dent. 2018 Dec 27;4(1):40. doi: 10.1186/s40729-018-0152-4.

Surgical options in oroantral fistula management: a narrative review.

Author information

1
Department of Oral Surgery and Implantology, Carolinum, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany.
2
Department of Oral Surgery and Implantology, Carolinum, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany. obreja@med.uni-frankfurt.de.
3
Department for Oral, Cranio-Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Medical Center of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
4
Department of Oral Surgery, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.

Abstract

An oroantral fistula (OAF) is a pathological abnormal communication between the oral cavity and the maxillary sinus which may arise as a result of failure of primary healing of an OAF, dental infections, osteomyelitis, radiation therapy, trauma, or iatrogenic complications. With the presence of a fistula, the maxillary sinus is permanently open. Microbial flora passes from the oral cavity into the maxillary sinus, and the inflammation of the sinus occurs with all potential consequences. In literature, various techniques have been proposed for closure of OAFs. Due to the heterogeneity of the data and techniques found, we opted for a narrative review to highlight the variety of techniques discussed in the literature. Techniques of particular interest include the bone sandwich with resorbable guided tissue regeneration (GTR) membrane and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) used alone as both a clot and a membrane. The great advantage of these techniques is that no donor site surgery is necessary, making the outcome valuable in terms of time savings, cost and, more importantly, less discomfort to the patient. Additionally, both bony and soft tissue closure is performed for OAF, in contrast to flaps, which are typically used for procedures in the sinus area. The reconstructed bony tissue regenerated from these techniques will also be appropriate for endosseous dental implantation.

KEYWORDS:

Complication management; Fistula; Flaps; Grafts; Maxillary sinus; Oral surgery; Oroantral

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center