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Ann Hematol. 2019 Feb;98(2):339-350. doi: 10.1007/s00277-018-3539-7. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of iron chelation therapy on overall survival and disease progression in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

Author information

1
Yale University School of Medicine and Yale Cancer Center, Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale New Haven, New Haven, CT, USA. amer.zeidan@yale.edu.
2
Yale University School of Medicine and Yale Cancer Center, Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale New Haven, New Haven, CT, USA.
3
Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Cardeza Foundation for Hematologic Research, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
5
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

The impact of iron chelation therapy (ICT) on overall survival (OS) and progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in patients with iron overload and International Prognostic Scoring System low- or intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is not well understood. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies of ICT in patients with MDS to better elucidate these relationships. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane databases, and the World Health Organization Clinical Trial Registry for studies reporting the impact of ICT on OS in patients with low- or intermediate-risk MDS. Studies were examined for demographics, effect measures, and potential bias risk. Fixed and random-effects models were used to calculate adjusted OS and adjusted hazards ratio (aHR) estimates, respectively, among the different studies. Nine observational studies (four prospective and five retrospective) were identified. For patients with MDS, ICT was associated with an overall lower risk of mortality compared with no ICT (aHR 0.42; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28-0.62; Pā€‰<ā€‰0.01); however, there was significant heterogeneity across the studies. In studies reporting progression to AML, ICT was not associated with decreased risk of progression (odds ratio 0.68; 95% CI 0.31-1.43; Pā€‰<ā€‰0.030). This systematic review and meta-analysis of nine nonrandomized trials demonstrated significant reduction in risk of mortality in patients with iron overload and low- or intermediate-risk MDS treated with ICT; however, a causal relationship cannot be established. Randomized, controlled trials are needed to more definitively evaluate the relationship between ICT and survival in patients with iron overload and low- or intermediate-risk MDS.

KEYWORDS:

Acute myeloid leukemia; Iron chelation therapy; Iron overload; Myelodysplastic syndromes; Survival

PMID:
30413901
DOI:
10.1007/s00277-018-3539-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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