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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2018 Oct;66(10):1927-1933. doi: 10.1111/jgs.15468. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

Self-Reported Physical Function As a Predictor of Hospitalization in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Study.

Author information

1
Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Sticht Center for Healthy Aging and Alzheimer's Prevention, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
2
Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
3
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
4
Department of Nutrition, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
6
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, Health Services Research Center, University of California, San Diego, California.
7
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
8
Department of Health Research and Policy, School of Medicine, Stanford University.
9
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford University.
10
Department of Medicine, General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.
11
Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, Institute on Aging, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
12
Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To explore whether baseline scores on the Mobility Assessment Tool-short form (MAT-sf), a brief, animated, computer-based means of assessing mobility that predicts mobility disability, are associated with number of hospitalizations and time to first hospitalization over a median follow-up of 2.7 years.

DESIGN:

Post hoc analysis of prospectively gathered data from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study, a randomized clinical trial of lifestyle interventions to preserve mobility in older adults.

SETTING:

Eight U.S. academic medical centers.

PARTICIPANTS:

Of 1,635 sedentary community-dwelling older adults enrolled in LIFE, 1,574 completed baseline physical function screening including the MAT-sf, with baseline scores ranging from 30.2 (low function) to 69.8 (high function) on a scale from 30 to 80.

MEASUREMENTS:

Number of hospitalizations and time to first hospitalization, adjusted for age, sex, race, living alone, clinical site, baseline comorbidities, number of prescription medications, and cognition.

RESULTS:

Of the 1,557 participants with data regarding hospitalization status, 726 (47%) had at least 1 hospitalization; 78% of these had 1 or 2 hospitalizations. For every 10-point lower MAT-sf score, the rate of all hospitalizations was 19% higher in those with lower scores (adjusted rate ratio=1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-1.32, p<.001). Lower baseline MAT-sf scores were also associated with greater risk of first hospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio=1.20, 95% CI=1.09-1.32, p<.01, per 10-point lower MAT-sf score).

CONCLUSION:

Low MAT-sf scores identify older adults at risk of hospitalization; further study is needed to test interventions to reduce hospitalizations in these individuals.

KEYWORDS:

hospitalization; mobility; physical function

PMID:
30281796
PMCID:
PMC6277208
[Available on 2019-10-03]
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.15468

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