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Pharmacy (Basel). 2018 Sep 29;6(4). pii: E107. doi: 10.3390/pharmacy6040107.

Addition of Care for Transgender-Related Patient Care into Doctorate of Pharmacy Curriculum: Implementation and Preliminary Evaluation.

Author information

1
College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Washington State University, PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA 99210-1495, USA. cheyenne.newsome@wsu.edu.
2
College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Washington State University, PO Box 1495, Spokane, WA 99210-1495, USA. Li-wei.chen@wsu.edu.
3
College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, MSC 09 5360 Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA. jeconklin@salud.unm.edu.

Abstract

The number of transgender and gender-diverse patients seeking medical care in the United States is increasing. For many of these patients, pharmacotherapy is a part of their gender-affirming transition. Effective instructional methods and resources for teaching pharmacy students about this patient population's social considerations and medical treatments is lacking. Three hours of educational material on caring for transgender patients was added to a third-year course in a four-year Doctorate of Pharmacy program in the United States. The content included cultural, empathy, and medical considerations. Students in the course were given a survey to assess their perception of each instructional method's effectiveness and self-assess their confidence in providing competent gender-affirming care to transgender people before and after the learning session. The survey response rate was 36% (54/152). Students' self-assessed confidence to provide competent care to people who are transgender increased significantly. Before the learning session, the median confidence level was 4/10 (Interquartile range (IQR) 3⁻6), after the class session, the median confidence increased to 7/10 (IQR 6⁻8, p < 0.01). Students rated the pre-class video, jeopardy game, and patient panel as most helpful to improving their skills. The addition of transgender-related patient care material into the Doctorate of Pharmacy curriculum significantly increased the students' confidence to provide competent care to people who are transgender.

KEYWORDS:

active learning; flipped classroom; health provider education; lesbian gay bisexual transgender (LGBT); pharmacy education; transgender; transgender education

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