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AIDS Behav. 2018 Sep 27. doi: 10.1007/s10461-018-2283-2. [Epub ahead of print]

Differences in Medical Mistrust Between Black and White Women: Implications for Patient-Provider Communication About PrEP.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, George Washington University, 2125 G Street NW, Washington, DC, 20052, USA. mtekeste@gwu.edu.
2
Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.
3
Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
5
Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
6
New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, New York, NY, USA.
7
Planned Parenthood of Southern New England, New Haven, CT, USA.
8
Department of Psychology, George Washington University, 2125 G Street NW, Washington, DC, 20052, USA.

Abstract

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective biomedical HIV prevention method. PrEP uptake has been persistently low among US women, particularly Black women, who account for 61% of new HIV diagnoses among women. Further understanding of barriers to Black women accessing PrEP is needed. This 2017 cross-sectional survey study explored race-based differences in PrEP interest and intention among women and the indirect association between race and comfort discussing PrEP with a healthcare provider through medical mistrust. The sample consisted of 501 adult women (241 Black; 260 White) who were HIV-negative, PrEP-inexperienced, and heterosexually active. Black women reported greater PrEP interest and intention than White women. However, Black women expressed higher levels of medical mistrust, which, in turn, was associated with lower comfort discussing PrEP with a provider. Medical mistrust may operate as a unique barrier to PrEP access among Black women who are interested in and could benefit from PrEP.

KEYWORDS:

Black/African American; HIV/AIDS; Medical mistrust; Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); Women

PMID:
30264207
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-018-2283-2

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