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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2018 Nov 1;192:137-145. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.07.037. Epub 2018 Sep 16.

Response inhibition and fronto-striatal-thalamic circuit dysfunction in cocaine addiction.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 300 George St, #901, New Haven, CT 06511, USA; Connecticut Mental Health Center, 34 Park St, New Haven, CT 06519, USA. Electronic address: wuyi.wang@yale.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 300 George St, #901, New Haven, CT 06511, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 300 George St, #901, New Haven, CT 06511, USA; Connecticut Mental Health Center, 34 Park St, New Haven, CT 06519, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 300 George St, #901, New Haven, CT 06511, USA; Connecticut Mental Health Center, 34 Park St, New Haven, CT 06519, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine, 200 S Frontage Rd, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, 230 South Frontage Rd., New Haven, CT 06519, USA; Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University School of Medicine, SHM L-200, P.O. Box 208074, New Haven CT 06520-8074, USA; Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling, 100 Great Meadow Rd., Wethersfield, CT 06109, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 300 George St, #901, New Haven, CT 06511, USA; Connecticut Mental Health Center, 34 Park St, New Haven, CT 06519, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine, 200 S Frontage Rd, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University School of Medicine, SHM L-200, P.O. Box 208074, New Haven CT 06520-8074, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many studies have investigated how cognitive control may be compromised in cocaine addiction. Here, we extend this literature by employing spatial Independent Component Analysis (ICA) to describe circuit dysfunction in relation to impairment in response inhibition in cocaine addiction.

METHODS:

Fifty-five cocaine-dependent (CD) and 55 age- and sex-matched non-drug-using healthy control individuals (HC) participated in the study. Task-relatedness of 40 independent components (ICs) was assessed using multiple regression analyses of component time courses with the modeled time courses of hemodynamic activity convolved with go success (GS), stop success (SS) and stop error (SE). This procedure produced beta-weights that represented the degree to which each IC was temporally associated with, or 'engaged', by each task event.

RESULTS:

Behaviorally, CD participants showed prolonged stop signal reaction times (SSRTs) as compared to HC participants (p < 0.01). ICA identified two networks that showed differences in engagement related to SS between CD and HC (p < 0.05, FDR-corrected). The activity of the fronto-striatal-thalamic network was negatively correlated with SSRTs in HC but not in CD, suggesting a specific role of this network in mediating deficits of response inhibition in CD individuals. In contrast, the engagement of the fronto-parietal-temporal network did not relate to SSRTs, was similarly less engaged for both SS and SE trials, and may reflect attentional dysfunction in cocaine addiction.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study highlights the utility of ICA in identifying neural circuitry engagement related to SST performance and suggests that specific networks may represent important targets in remedying executive-control impairment in cocaine addiction.

KEYWORDS:

Cocaine abuse; ICA; SSRT; Stop signal task; fMRI

PMID:
30248560
PMCID:
PMC6200592
[Available on 2019-11-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.07.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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