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Environ Health Perspect. 2018 Aug;126(8):84503. doi: 10.1289/EHP3997.

Opportunities and Challenges for Dietary Arsenic Intervention.

Author information

1
Risk Sciences and Public Policy Institute, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
2
Department of Environmental Health and Engineering, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
3
Department of Health Policy and Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
4
Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
5
Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.
6
Dartmouth Superfund Research Program, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.
7
Dartmouth Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.
8
Department of Epidemiology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.
9
Department of Earth Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.
10
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
11
Department of Food Safety, Nutrition and Veterinary Public Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità - Italian National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy.
12
Yale School of Public Health, 60 College St, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
13
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.
14
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA.
15
Department of Community, Environment and Policy, Mel & Enid College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA.
16
Institute for Global Food Security, Queen's University Belfast, David Keir Building, Malone Road, Belfast, BT9 5BN, Northern Ireland, UK.
17
Western States Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
18
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, New York, USA.
19
University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle, Washington, USA.
20
Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
21
Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
22
Land and Materials Management Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
23
Institute of Nutritional Sciences, University of Potsdam, Germany.
24
National Toxicology Program Laboratory, National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.

Abstract

The diet is emerging as the dominant source of arsenic exposure for most of the U.S. population. Despite this, limited regulatory efforts have been aimed at mitigating exposure, and the role of diet in arsenic exposure and disease processes remains understudied. In this brief, we discuss the evidence linking dietary arsenic intake to human disease and discuss challenges associated with exposure characterization and efforts to quantify risks. In light of these challenges, and in recognition of the potential longer-term process of establishing regulation, we introduce a framework for shorter-term interventions that employs a field-to-plate food supply chain model to identify monitoring, intervention, and communication opportunities as part of a multisector, multiagency, science-informed, public health systems approach to mitigation of dietary arsenic exposure. Such an approach is dependent on coordination across commodity producers, the food industry, nongovernmental organizations, health professionals, researchers, and the regulatory community. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP3997.

PMID:
30235424
DOI:
10.1289/EHP3997
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