Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Proc Biol Sci. 2018 Sep 19;285(1887). pii: 20180670. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2018.0670.

The ecology of movement and behaviour: a saturated tripartite network for describing animal contacts.

Author information

1
Department of Wildland Resources, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA kezia.manlove@gmail.com.
2
Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA.
3
Department of Wildland Resources, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA.
4
US Geological Survey, Western Ecological Research Center, Henderson, NV, USA.
5
Center for Infectious Disease Modeling and Analysis (CIDMA), Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
6
Department of Mathematical Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA.
7
Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.
8
US Geological Survey, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center, 2327 University Way, Ste. 2, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA.

Abstract

Ecologists regularly use animal contact networks to describe interactions underlying pathogen transmission, gene flow, and information transfer. However, empirical descriptions of contact often overlook some features of individual movement, and decisions about what kind of network to use in a particular setting are commonly ad hoc Here, we relate individual movement trajectories to contact networks through a tripartite network model of individual, space, and time nodes. Most networks used in animal contact studies (e.g. individual association networks, home range overlap networks, and spatial networks) are simplifications of this tripartite model. The tripartite structure can incorporate a broad suite of alternative ecological metrics like home range sizes and patch occupancy patterns into inferences about contact network metrics such as modularity and degree distribution. We demonstrate the model's utility with two simulation studies using alternative forms of ecological data to constrain the tripartite network's structure and inform expectations about the harder-to-measure metrics related to contact.

KEYWORDS:

Lagrangian movement; contact network; network projection; pathogen transmission; tripartite tagging network

PMID:
30232156
PMCID:
PMC6170809
[Available on 2019-09-26]
DOI:
10.1098/rspb.2018.0670

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center