Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Laryngoscope. 2018 Dec;128(12):2762-2769. doi: 10.1002/lary.27315. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Changing prognosis of oral cancer: An analysis of survival and treatment between 1973 and 2014.

Author information

1
Division of Otolaryngology, Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
2
Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS:

Oral cavity cancer is the most commonly occurring malignancy of the head and neck. There are limited data suggesting a change in prognosis of oral cavity cancers. We aimed to evaluate temporal trends in demographics, treatment, and prognosis of oral cavity cancer diagnosed between 1973 and 2014 inclusive.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective database analysis.

METHODS:

A retrospective study of 16,030 adult patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer between 1973 and 2014 inclusive and treated surgically in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 9 registry was conducted. A supplemental analysis was conducted using data from the National Cancer Database. Multivariate Cox survival regressions and univariate Kaplan-Meier analyses were conducted.

RESULTS:

The prognosis of both early- and late-stage disease has significantly improved between 1973 and 2014. Among patients with early-stage disease, 3-year survival increased from 78.0% (standard error [SE] = 1.3) for those diagnosed from 1973 to 1980 to 92.2% (SE = 1.1) for those diagnosed from 2011 to 2014. Among patients with late-stage disease, 3-year survival ranged from 51.9% (SE = 1.5) for those diagnosed from 1973 to 1980 to 70.3% (SE = 1.9) for those diagnosed from 2011 to 2014. For patients with late-stage disease, this improved prognosis occurred in tandem with increasing usage of chemoradiotherapy as adjuvant therapy. There has also been increasing utilization of neck dissection for early- and late-stage disease, along with higher nodal yields from performed dissections.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prognosis of oral cavity cancer has improved significantly from the early 1970s to recent years. In late-stage oral cancer, this change has been associated with an increased use of adjuvant therapy and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy in particular.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

4 Laryngoscope, 128:2762-2769, 2018.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Oral cavity cancer; Surveillance; adjuvant therapy; and End Results; outcomes; prognosis; survival; trends

PMID:
30194691
DOI:
10.1002/lary.27315
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center