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Am J Ind Med. 2018 Oct;61(10):849-860. doi: 10.1002/ajim.22902. Epub 2018 Aug 28.

Knee pain in nursing home workers after implementation of a safe resident handling program.

Author information

1
Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
2
Gold Standard Research Consulting, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania.
3
Center for the Promotion of Health in the New England Workplace, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Approximately 25-30% of nursing personnel experience knee pain (KP). We sought to identify physical and psychosocial work exposures, and personal factors related to prevalent, incident, and persistent KP 5-8 years after safe resident handing program (SRHP) implementation in nursing homes.

METHODS:

Health and exposure information was obtained from worker surveys 5-6 years ("F5") and 7-8 years ("F6") post-SRHP implementation. Prevalent KP correlates were examined at F5; persistent and incident KP predictors were analyzed at F6, utilizing robust Poisson multivariable regression.

RESULTS:

F5 KP prevalence (19.7%) was associated with combined physical exposures, and with either high job strain or low social support, in separate models. Two-year persistent KP was similarly associated with these psychosocial exposures. Being overweight was associated with KP in all analyses.

CONCLUSIONS:

The SRHP program did not eliminate knee physical loading, which should be reduced to prevent nursing home worker KP. Workplace psychosocial exposures (high job strain, low social support) also appeared germane.

KEYWORDS:

healthcare workers; job strain; lower extremity; moving and lifting patients; workload

PMID:
30156000
PMCID:
PMC6430608
[Available on 2019-10-01]
DOI:
10.1002/ajim.22902
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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