Format

Send to

Choose Destination
JAMA Dermatol. 2018 Oct 1;154(10):1167-1174. doi: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2018.2357.

Self-reported Patient Motivations for Seeking Cosmetic Procedures.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.
2
Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Department of Dermatology, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Jamaica Plain, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Department of Pathology, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois.
6
Skin Laser & Surgery Specialists of New York and New Jersey, New York.
7
Dermatology Cosmetic and Laser Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston.
8
Advanced Skin Research Center, Omaha, Nebraska.
9
Department of Dermatology, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey.
10
Skin Research Institute and Skin Associates of South Florida, Coral Gables.
11
Union Square Laser Dermatology, New York, New York.
12
California Skin Institute, Carmel, Salinas, and Monterey.
13
Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston.
14
Krauss Dermatology, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts.
15
SkinCare Physicians, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts.
16
Department of Dermatology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
17
Department of Dermatology, Brown Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island.
18
Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
19
Division of Dermatology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Rutgers School of Medicine, Newark.
20
Fordham University Law School, New York, New York.
21
Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Diego.
22
Goldman, Butterwick, Groff, Fabi and Wu Cosmetic Laser Dermatology, A West Dermatology Company, San Diego, California.
23
Laser and Cosmetic Center/McDaniel Institute of Anti-Aging Research, Virginia Beach.
24
Lance H. Brown, MD, PLLC, New York, New York.
25
Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York.
26
Aesthetx, Campbell, California.
27
Skin Care and Laser Physicians of Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, California.
28
Maryland Laser Skin and Vein Institute, Hunt Valley.
29
Chicago Cosmetic Surgery and Dermatology, Chicago, Illinois.
30
Laser & Skin Surgery Medical Group, Inc, Sacramento, California.
31
Department of Dermatology, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Oakland.
32
Wesson Dermatology, Great Neck, New York.
33
Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia.
34
Hampton University Skin of Color Research Institute, Hampton, Virginia.
35
School of Science, Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia.
36
Capital Laser and Skin Care, Chevy Chase, Maryland.
37
Department of Dermatology, George Washington University, Washington, DC.
38
Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida.
39
Hollywood Dermatology and Cosmetic Surgery Specialist, Hollywood, Florida.
40
Department of Otolaryngology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.
41
Department of Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

Abstract

Importance:

Despite the growing popularity of cosmetic procedures, the sociocultural and quality-of-life factors that motivate patients to undergo such procedures are not well understood.

Objective:

To estimate the relative importance of factors that motivate patients to seek minimally invasive cosmetic procedures.

Design, Setting, and Participants:

This prospective, multicenter observational study was performed at 2 academic and 11 private dermatology practice sites that represented all US geographic regions. Adult patients presenting for cosmetic consultation or treatment from December 4, 2016, through August 9, 2017, were eligible for participation.

Exposures:

Participants completed a survey instrument based on a recently developed subjective framework of motivations and a demographic questionnaire.

Main Outcomes and Measures:

Primary outcomes were the self-reported most common motivations in each quality-of-life category. Secondary outcomes were other frequently reported motivations and those associated with specific procedures.

Results:

Of 529 eligible patients, 511 agreed to participate, were enrolled, and completed the survey. Typical respondents were female (440 [86.1%]), 45 years or older (286 [56.0%]), white (386 [75.5%]), and college educated (469 [91.8%]) and had previously received at least 2 cosmetic procedures (270 [52.8%]). Apart from motivations pertaining to aesthetic appearance, including the desire for beautiful skin and a youthful, attractive appearance, motives related to physical health, such as preventing worsening of condition or symptoms (253 of 475 [53.3%]), and psychosocial well-being, such as the desire to feel happier and more confident or improve total quality of life (314 of 467 [67.2%]), treat oneself or celebrate (284 of 463 [61.3%]), and look good professionally (261 of 476 [54.8%]) were commonly reported. Motivations related to cost and convenience were rated as less important (68 of 483 [14.1%]). Most motivations were internally generated, designed to please the patients and not others, with patients making the decision to undergo cosmetic procedures themselves and spouses seldom being influential. Patients younger than 45 years were more likely to undertake procedures to prevent aging (54 of 212 [25.5%] vs 42 of 286 [14.7%] among patients ā‰„45 years; Pā€‰<ā€‰.001). Patients seeking certain procedures, such as body contouring (19 of 22 [86.4%]), acne scar treatment (36 of 42 [85.7%]), and tattoo removal (8 of 11 [72.7%]), were more likely to report psychological and emotional motivations.

Conclusions and Relevance:

This initial prospective, multicenter study comprehensively assessed why patients seek minimally invasive cosmetic procedures. Common reasons included emotional, psychological, and practical motivations in addition to the desire to enhance physical appearance. Differences relative to patient age and procedures sought may need further exploration.

PMID:
30140900
PMCID:
PMC6233736
[Available on 2019-08-15]
DOI:
10.1001/jamadermatol.2018.2357

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center