Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurourol Urodyn. 2018 Nov;37(8):2951-2964. doi: 10.1002/nau.23787. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

The Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) in girls and women: Developing a conceptual framework for a prevention research agenda.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology & Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
2
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
3
Division of Urology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
4
Department of Urology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
5
Division of Academic General Pediatrics, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California.
6
Division of Gerontology, Geriatrics, and Palliative Care, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
7
Birmingham/Atlanta Veterans Affairs Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Birmingham, Alabama.
8
Howard Brown Health, Chicago, Illinois.
9
Rush University College of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois.
10
Division of Community Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Public Health, Chicago, Illinois.
11
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
12
Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut.
13
School of Nursing, Women's Studies, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
14
Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
15
School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
16
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
17
Division of Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California.

Abstract

AIMS:

The Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium was established by the National Institutes of Health in 2015 to expand research beyond the detection and treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) to the promotion and preservation of bladder health and prevention of LUTS in girls and women. While many multi-disciplinary scientific networks focus on pelvic floor dysfunction and LUTS, the PLUS Consortium stands alone in its focus on prevention. This article describes the PLUS approach to developing a conceptual framework to guide the Consortium's initial prevention research agenda.

METHODS:

The conceptual framework was informed by traditional social ecological models of public health, biopsychosocial models of health, Glass and McAtee's Society-Behavior-Biology Nexus, and the World Health Organization's conceptual framework for action on the social determinants of health.

RESULTS:

The PLUS conceptual framework provides a foundation for developing prevention interventions that have the greatest likelihood of promoting and preserving bladder health among diverse populations.

CONCLUSIONS:

PLUS Consortium work is premised on the notion that programs, practices, and policies designed to promote health will have optimal impact if the conceptual foundation upon which efforts are based is comprehensive and informed by multiple disciplines. The PLUS conceptual framework is broadly applicable to domains of health that have historically focused on the treatment of illness and symptoms rather than the promotion of health. It is also applicable to domains of health that have been examined from a predominantly biological or social ecological perspective, without integration of both perspectives.

KEYWORDS:

bladder health; conceptual framework; girls; lower urinary tract symptoms; prevention; social ecology; women

PMID:
30136299
DOI:
10.1002/nau.23787

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center