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Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2018 Sep 1;102(1):174-183. doi: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2018.05.032. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

High Single Doses of Radiation May Induce Elevated Levels of Hypoxia in Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Tumors.

Author information

1
Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
2
Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
3
Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
4
Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
5
Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. Electronic address: david.j.carlson@yale.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Tumor hypoxia correlates with treatment failure in patients undergoing conventional radiation therapy. However, no published studies have investigated tumor hypoxia in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We aimed to noninvasively quantify the tumor hypoxic volume (HV) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors to elucidate the potential role of tumor vascular response and reoxygenation at high single doses.

METHODS AND MATERIALS:

Six SBRT-eligible patients with NSCLC tumors >1 cm were prospectively enrolled in an institutional review board-approved study. Dynamic positron emission tomography images were acquired at 0 to 120 minutes, 150 to 180 minutes, and 210 to 240 minutes after injection of 18F-fluoromisonidazole. Serial imaging was performed prior to delivery of 18 Gy and at approximately 48 hours and approximately 96 hours after SBRT. Tumor HVs were quantified using the tumor-to-blood ratio (>1.2) and rate of tracer influx (>0.0015 mL·min·cm-3).

RESULTS:

An elevated and in some cases persistent level of tumor hypoxia was observed in 3 of 6 patients. Two patients exhibited no detectable baseline tumor hypoxia, and 1 patient with high baseline hypoxia only completed 1 imaging session. On the basis of the tumor-to-blood ratio, in the remaining 3 patients, tumor HVs increased on day 2 after 18 Gy and then showed variable responses on day 4. In the 3 of 6 patients with detectable hypoxia at baseline, baseline tumor HVs ranged between 17% and 24% (mean, 21%), and HVs on days 2 and 4 ranged between 33% and 45% (mean, 40%) and between 18% and 42% (mean, 28%), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

High single doses of radiation delivered as part of SBRT may induce an elevated and in some cases persistent state of tumor hypoxia in NSCLC tumors. Hypoxia imaging with 18F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography should be used in a larger cohort of NSCLC patients to determine whether elevated tumor hypoxia is predictive of treatment failure in SBRT.

PMID:
30102194
PMCID:
PMC6092043
[Available on 2019-09-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2018.05.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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