Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Surgery. 2018 Dec;164(6):1230-1233. doi: 10.1016/j.surg.2018.06.002. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Evaluating the adoption of primary anastomosis with proximal diversion for emergent cases of surgically managed diverticulitis.

Author information

1
Section of General Surgery, Trauma, and Surgical Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
2
Section of General Surgery, Trauma, and Surgical Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. Electronic address: Kevin.Pei@yale.edu.
3
Section of Surgical Outcomes and Epidemiology, Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
4
Section of Surgical Outcomes and Epidemiology, Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although Hartmann procedure is common for operatively managed acute diverticulitis, there is accumulating evidence that primary anastomosis with proximal small bowel diversion is safe, even in emergent cases. This study seeks to clarify the current adoption of primary anastomosis with proximal small bowel diversion among emergent, operatively managed cases of acute diverticulitis and compare outcomes between primary anastomosis with proximal small bowel diversion and Hartmann procedure.

METHODS:

Patients who underwent open, emergent Hartmann procedure or primary anastomosis with proximal small bowel diversion for a primary diagnosis of diverticulitis between 2005 and 2015 were identified in the database of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Outcomes were compared with logistic regression adjusted for patient and operative characteristics.

RESULTS:

From 2005-2015 the proportion of primary anastomosis with proximal small bowel diversion decreased from 33% to 17% among emergent cases. Although mortality and complications were similar, primary anastomosis with proximal small bowel diversion resulted in a greater risk of returning to the operating room in emergent cases (odds ratio = 1.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.06-1.74).

CONCLUSION:

Despite previous suggestions of clinical equipoise, the adoption of primary anastomosis with proximal small bowel diversion for emergent, operatively managed acute diverticulitis among National Surgical Quality Improvement Program hospitals appears to be decreasing. Primary anastomosis with proximal small bowel diversion resulted in increased return to the operating room for emergent cases, suggesting that caution should be exercised in selecting primary anastomosis with proximal small bowel diversion for emergent cases.

PMID:
30033184
DOI:
10.1016/j.surg.2018.06.002

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center