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Diabetes Educ. 2018 Oct;44(5):444-453. doi: 10.1177/0145721718787782. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Perceived Barriers to Physical Activity Among Low-Income Latina Women at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes.

Author information

1
Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
2
Fair Haven Community Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
3
Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine perceived barriers to physical activity among low-income Latina women who were at risk for type 2 diabetes, as well as the demographic factors that influence these perceived barriers. Methods Recruited in the waiting room of a community health center in a low-income neighborhood (n = 160), Latina women between the ages of 18 and 49 years completed a survey to assess demographic characteristics and perceived barriers to physical inactivity. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, and multivariate regression analyses were conducted to identify barriers to physical activity and the associations between demographic factors and perceived barriers. Results The most commonly perceived barriers to physical activity in the study sample were lack of willpower and lack of energy. After adjusting for other characteristics, overweight/obese participants were more likely than women of normal weight to report social influence and fear of injury as important barriers to exercise. In addition, women whose preferred language was Spanish were more likely than women whose preferred language was English to perceive lack of time, and social influence as important barriers. Conclusions The effective encouragement of physical activity among Latina women at risk for type 2 diabetes must address the perceived barriers of lack of willpower and lack of energy. Although all women at risk for type 2 diabetes could benefit from counseling and other strategies to encourage physical activity, these efforts should be targeted toward Spanish-speaking overweight/obese women, who are more likely to perceive barriers to exercise.

PMID:
30014770
DOI:
10.1177/0145721718787782
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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