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PLoS One. 2018 Jul 11;13(7):e0199745. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0199745. eCollection 2018.

Disparities by race, age, and sex in the improvement of survival for lymphoma: Findings from a population-based study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, United States of America.
2
Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States of America.
3
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, United States of America.
4
Vietnam Colorectal Cancer and Research Program, Vinmec Healthcare System, Hanoi, Vietnam.
5
Vietnam National Cancer Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
6
Vietnam National Institute for Cancer Control, Hanoi, Vietnam.
7
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States of America.
8
Vinmec University of Health Sciences Project, Vinmec Healthcare System, Hanoi, Vietnam.
9
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, United States of America.
10
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, United of States America.
11
Currently at the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, United of States America.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate improvement in survival of lymphoma patients from 1990 to 2014, stratified by age, sex and race using Surveillance Epidemiology and End-Result Survey Program (SEER) data.

STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING:

We identified 113,788 incident lymphoma cases from nine SEER cancer registries were followed up for cause-specific mortality from lymphoma. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and their respective 95% confidence interval (CIs) for various time periods within groups stratified by race, age and sex.

RESULTS:

Five-year survival for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) was 89% for patients 20-49 years of age. For this age group, compared to 1990-1994, survival significantly improved in 2000-2004 (HR = 0.65; 95% CI: 0.54-0.78), 2005-2009 (HR = 0.46, 95% CI: 0.38-0.57) and 2010-2014 (HR = 0.29, 95% CI: 0.20-0.41). Hodgkin's lymphoma patients aged 75-85 years had 5-year survival of 37% and in these patients, compared to 1990-1994, survival only improved from 2005 onward (HR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.50-0.90). In patients with non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL), all age groups showed survival improvements between 1990-1994 period and 2010-2014 period. Improvements in HL and NHL survival were seen for all race categories and both genders.

CONCLUSION:

Survival among US lymphoma patients has improved substantially between 1990-1994 period and 2010-2014 period, though disease-specific mortality was still higher in older age groups.

PMID:
29995909
PMCID:
PMC6040734
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0199745
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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