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Cell Rep. 2018 Jul 3;24(1):47-55. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2018.06.008.

Uncoupling Hepatic Oxidative Phosphorylation Reduces Tumor Growth in Two Murine Models of Colon Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
2
Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Department of Dermatology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
3
Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
4
Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2, Canada; Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2, Canada; Segal Cancer Centre, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2, Canada.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: rachel.perry@yale.edu.

Abstract

Obesity is associated with colon cancer pathogenesis, but the underlying mechanism is actively debated. Here, we confirm that diet-induced obesity promotes tumor growth in two murine colon cancer models and show that this effect is reversed by an orally administered controlled-release mitochondrial protonophore (CRMP) that acts as a liver-specific uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation. This agent lowered circulating insulin, and the reduction of tumor growth was abrogated by an insulin infusion raising plasma insulin to the level of high-fat-fed mice. We also demonstrate that hyperinsulinemia increases glucose uptake and oxidation in vivo in tumors and that CRMP reverses these effects. This study provides evidence that perturbations of whole-organism energy balance or hepatic energy metabolism can influence neoplastic growth. Furthermore, the data show that glucose uptake and utilization by cancers in vivo are not necessarily constitutively high but rather may vary according to the hormonal milieu.

KEYWORDS:

colon adenocarcinoma; glucose metabolism; insulin; insulin resistance; uncoupling

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