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AIDS Behav. 2018 Jun 28. doi: 10.1007/s10461-018-2206-2. [Epub ahead of print]

The Role of Religious Service Attendance, Psychosocial and Behavioral Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Adherence: Results from HPTN 063 Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, 60 College Street, LEPH 4th Floor, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA. yusuf.ransome@yale.edu.
2
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. yusuf.ransome@yale.edu.
3
The Fenway Institute, Fenway Health, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Division of Global Public Health, School of Medicine, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA.
7
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA.
8
University of Puerto Rico School of Public Health, San Juan, PR, USA.
9
Faculty of Medicine, and Research Institute for Health Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
10
Instituto de Pesquisa Clinica Evandro Chagas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
11
Zambart, Lusaka, Zambia.
12
Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA.

Abstract

Early and sustained antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence can suppress the HIV virus in individuals and reduce onward transmission of HIV in the population. Religiosity has been associated with better HIV clinical outcomes. Data are from a longitudinal, observational study of 749 HIV-infected individuals from Brazil, Zambia, and Thailand (HPTN 063). Ordered logistic regression assessed whether religious service attendance was associated with ART adherence (self-reported and plasma HIV-RNA) and moderated the association between alcohol problems and ART adherence. In each country,ā€‰>ā€‰80% of participants reported high self-reported ART adherence (good/very good/excellent). Religious service attendance exceeded 85% but was statistically unrelated to adherence. In combined-country models, (pā€‰=ā€‰0.03) as alcohol problems increased, the probability of high self-reported ART adherence, as well as viral-load, became weaker at higher compared to low service attendance frequency. Future studies should evaluate spirituality variables and replicate the moderation analyses between religious attendance and alcohol problems.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence; HIV/AIDS; HPTN; Religion

PMID:
29956116
PMCID:
PMC6310676
[Available on 2019-12-28]
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-018-2206-2

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