Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Cell Res. 2018 Nov;1865(11 Pt B):1761-1770. doi: 10.1016/j.bbamcr.2018.05.010. Epub 2018 May 19.

Regulation of bile secretion by calcium signaling in health and disease.

Author information

1
Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8019, USA.
2
Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8019, USA. Electronic address: michael.nathanson@yale.edu.

Abstract

Calcium (Ca2+) signaling controls secretion in many types of cells and tissues. In the liver, Ca2+ regulates secretion in both hepatocytes, which are responsible for primary formation of bile, and cholangiocytes, which line the biliary tree and further condition the bile before it is secreted. Cholestatic liver diseases, which are characterized by impaired bile secretion, may result from impaired Ca2+ signaling mechanisms in either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. This review will discuss the Ca2+ signaling machinery and mechanisms responsible for regulation of secretion in both hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and the pathophysiological changes in Ca2+ signaling that can occur in each of these cell types to result in cholestasis.

KEYWORDS:

Bile secretion; Calcium; Cholangiocyte; Cholestasis; Hepatocyte; Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor

PMID:
29787781
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbamcr.2018.05.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center