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AIDS Care. 2018 Sep;30(9):1156-1160. doi: 10.1080/09540121.2018.1466983. Epub 2018 Apr 22.

Examining relationships of intimate partner violence and food insecurity with HIV-related risk factors among young pregnant Liberian women.

Author information

1
a Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology , Yale School of Public Health and the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS, Yale University , New Haven , CT , USA.
2
b Department of Health Promotion and Behavior , University of Georgia , Athens , GA , USA.
3
c Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences , Yale School of Public Health and the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS, Yale University , New Haven , CT , USA.

Abstract

Gender inequities place women at an increased risk for HIV acquisition, and this association may particularly disenfranchize young pregnant women. Intimate partner violence (IPV) and food insecurity may contribute to gender differences in power, thereby influencing HIV disparities between women and men. Factors influencing gender disparities in HIV are unique and country-specific within sub-Saharan Africa, yet these factors are understudied among women in Liberia. This paper sought to examine the unique contributions and intersections of intimate partner violence (IPV) and food insecurity with HIV-related risk factors among young pregnant women in Liberia. Between March 2016 and August 2016, cross-sectional data collected from 195 women aged 18-30, residing in Monrovia, Liberia who were receiving prenatal services were used to examine the independent and interaction effects of IPV and food insecurity on HIV-related risk factors (i.e., sexual partner concurrency, economically-motivated relationships). IPV (31.3%) and food insecurity (47.7%) were prevalent. Young women who experience IPV are more likely to report food insecurity (p < 0.05). Young women who experienced IPV and food insecurity were more likely to start a new relationship for economic support (ps < 0.05). Young women who experience IPV and food insecurity were more likely to report engaging in transactional sex (ps < 0.05). There were no significant interaction effects between IPV and food insecurity (ps > 0.05). IPV and food insecurity each uniquely heighten young Liberian women's vulnerability to HIV. Intervention and policy efforts are need to promote and empower women's sexual health through integrated sexual and reproductive health services, and reduce IPV and food insecurity among pregnant Liberian women.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; Intimate partner violence; Liberia; sexual risk; women

PMID:
29682990
PMCID:
PMC6037546
[Available on 2019-09-01]
DOI:
10.1080/09540121.2018.1466983

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