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Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2017;30(4):10-25. doi: 10.12927/cjnl.2017.25452.

Perspectives of Nurse Practitioner-Physician Collaboration among Nurse Practitioners in Canadian Long-Term Care Homes: A National Survey.

Author information

1
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
2
Professor, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
3
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of Regina, Regina, SK.
4
Associate Professor, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
5
Professor, School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.
6
Associate Professor, Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON.
7
Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
8
Associate Professor, School of Nursing, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC.
9
Professor, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK.
10
Palliative Care Physician, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, ON.

Abstract

Nurse practitioners (NPs) can play an important role in providing primary care to residents in long-term care (LTC) homes. However, relatively little is known about the day-to-day collaboration between NPs and physicians (MDs) in LTC, or factors that may influence this collaboration. Survey data from NPs in Canadian LTC homes were used to explore these issues. Thirty-seven of the 45 (82%) identified LTC NPs across Canada completed the survey. NPs worked with an average of 3.4 MDs, ranging from 1-26 MDs. The most common reasons for collaborating included managing acute and chronic conditions, and updating MDs on resident status changes. Satisfaction with NP-MD collaboration was high, and did not significantly differ among NPs working full versus part time, NPs working in a single versus multiple homes, or NPs with more versus less experience. By understanding the nature of NP-MD collaboration, we can identify ways of supporting and enhancing collaboration between these professionals.

PMID:
29676987
DOI:
10.12927/cjnl.2017.25452
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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