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Gastroenterology. 2018 Aug;155(2):307-310.e2. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2018.04.014. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Proton Density Fat Fraction Associates With Progression of Fibrosis in Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

Author information

1
NAFLD Research Center, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California.
2
NAFLD Research Center, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California; Université Lyon 1, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France.
3
Liver Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California.
4
Department of Pathology, Sharp Medical Group, San Diego, California.
5
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, California.
6
Department of Pathology, University of California, San Diego, California.
7
Université Lyon 1, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France.
8
NAFLD Research Center, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California; Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California. Electronic address: roloomba@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

Markers are needed to predict progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The proton density fat fraction, measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-PDFF), provides an accurate, validated marker of hepatic steatosis; however, it is not clear whether the PDFF identifies patients at risk for NAFLD progression. We performed a follow-up study of 95 well-characterized patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD and examined the association between liver fat content and fibrosis progression. MRI-PDFF measurements were made at study entry (baseline). Biopsies were collected from patients at baseline and after a mean time period of 1.75 years. Among patients with no fibrosis at baseline, a higher proportion of patients in the higher liver fat group (MRI-PDFF ≥15.7%) had fibrosis progression (38.1%) than in the lower liver fat group (11.8%) (P = .067). In multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models (adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, and body mass index), patients in the higher liver fat group had a significantly higher risk of fibrosis progression (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio 6.7; 95% confidence interval 1.01-44.1; P = .049). Our findings associate higher liver fat content, measured by MRI-PDFF, with fibrosis progression.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarker; NASH; Risk Factor; Steatosis

PMID:
29660324
PMCID:
PMC6090543
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2018.04.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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